University Catalog 2005-2006

Information Systems (INFS)

Information and Software Engineering

310/IT 308 Program Structure and Design for Business Applications (3:3:0) Prerequisite: computer programming course in high school or college. Teaches structured programming and design using a high-level language. Focus is on program design, coding, debugging, and documentation.

311/IT 316 Database Management (3:3:0) Prerequisite: computer programming course in high school or college. Study of logical and physical characteristics of data and their organization in computer processing. Course emphasizes data as a resource in computer applications, and examines database management system (DBMS) software and its design, implementation, and use.

312 Computer Architecture and Operating Systems (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 310 or CS 112. Introduction to computing system hardware components, architecture, organization, and operating system software concepts. Provides basic experience in assembly language programming for modern microprocessors, and examines techniques for system evaluation and selection.

315 High-Level Programming Languages (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 310 or CS 112. Study of the structure and application of high-level languages by stressing the design and implementation of data types, data structures, and algorithms. Computing lab is included. Credit for this course does not count toward the requirements for a major in computer science.

316 Software Systems Engineering (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 310 or CS 211. Study of programming environments, including software tools and control of software development for large information systems engineering projects.

462/IT 462: Information Security Principles (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 312 or equivalent. Study of security policies, models, and mechanisms for secrecy, integrity, availability and usage controls. Topics include models and mechanisms for mandatory, discretionary and role-based access controls; authentication technologies; control and prevention of viruses and other rogue programs; common system vulnerabilities and countermeasures; privacy and security policies and risk analysis; intellectual property protection; legal and social issues.

466/IT 466: Network Security (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 312 or equivalent. Symmetric and asymmetric cryptography; encryption, message authentication codes and digital signatures; cryptographic authentication; digital certificates and public key infrastructure; standards process; cryptographic protocols; SSL, IPSEC and related protocols; secure e-mail; intrusion detection.

498 Independent Study in Information Systems Engineering (1-3:0:0) Prerequisite: 60 credits; must be arranged with an instructor and approved by the department chair before registering. Directed self-study of special topics of current interest in INFS. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits if the topics are substantially different.

499 Special Topics in Information Systems Engineering (3:3:0) Prerequisites: 60 credits and permission of instructor. Topics of special interest to undergraduates. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits if the topics are substantially different.

501 Discrete and Logical Structures for Information Systems (3:3:0) Prerequisites: 6 credits of undergraduate mathematics. Study of discrete and logical structures for information systems analysis and design including basic set theory and proof techniques, propositional and predicate logic, trees and graphs, finite state machines, formal languages and their relation to automata, computability and computational complexity, formal semantics-operational, axiomatic and denotational approaches. Credit cannot be applied to any graduate degree in IT&E or the BS degree in computer science.

514 Database Design and Management (3:3:0) Prerequisites: one programming course and 6 credits of college math. Relational database management systems. Covers logical and physical database design, query languages, and databases programming. Commercial systems are examined. Computing lab.

515 Computer Organization (3:3:0) Prerequisites: undergraduate courses or equivalent knowledge in structured programming in a high-level language. Computer hardware organization: arithmetic and logical operations; combinational and sequential logic; machine representation of numbers, characters, and instructions; addressing techniques; microprogramming; reduced instruction set computers. Symbolic assembly language and interrupts and input/output organization, are also covered. Credit cannot be applied to any graduate degree in IT&E or the BS degree in computer science.

565 Database and Distributed System Security Principles (3:3:0) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An introduction to information and distributed system security fundamentals. Topics include notions of security, threats and attacks; legal-ethical issues; security evaluation; data models, concepts, and mechanisms for database and distributed system security; inference in statistical databases; basic issues in operating system, application and network security.

590 Program Design and Data Structures (3:3:0) Prerequisite: undergraduate courses or equivalent knowledge in structured programming in a high-level language. Study of the fundamentals of data structures and algorithms applied in programming solutions to application problems. The course stresses programming in a modern high-level language. Laboratory required. Credit cannot be applied to any graduate degree in IT&E.

601 Operating Systems Theory and Practice (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 501, 515, and 590 or equivalent. Fundamental concepts including process synchronization and scheduling, interprocess communication, memory management, virtual memory, deadlocks, security and access-control, file and disk management, performance analysis, and distributed systems. The impact of computer architecture on operating systems is examined. Case studies and comparative analysis of operating systems are presented. No substitution can be made for this class.

612: Principles and Practices of Communication Networks (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 501, 515, and 590 (or equivalent) Introduces principles of computer networks and their applications to the Internet. Details of layering, protocols, performance, resource allocation, management, security and other contemporary issues related to networks are discussed. Examples of the course material are protocols such as HTTP(S), DNS, TCP/IP, RSVP, SNMP, algorithms such as DijkstraÕs link state routing, security measures such as firewalls and encryption, principles behind them and analysis of their performance. No substitutions can be made for this class.

614 Database Management (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 501, 515 and 590; or equivalent. Introduction to database systems, emphasizing the study of database models and languages and the practice of database design and programming. Topics include Entity-Relationship model, relational model and its formal query languages, SQL, the theory of relational database design, and object-oriented and logic-based databases. Computing lab is required. No substitutions can be made for this class.

622 Information Systems Analysis and Design (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 501, 515 and 590; or equivalent. Integration of computing technologies, systems analysis, system design practices, and management criteria in the design of large-scale information management and decision support systems. Cases and a computing lab are included.

623 Classical and Web Information Retrieval (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 501, 515, and 590; or equivalent. Study of models and methods for storage and retrieval of unstructured information, such as documents. Topics include information retrieval models, automatic indexing, document clustering, statistical thesauri, search techniques, performance measurement, answer visualization, and search engines for retrieval from the web.

640 Introduction to Electronic Commerce (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 501, 515, and 590; or equivalent. Electronic Commerce in its broadest sense; information technology support; business support (financial, marketing, resource planning, etc.); ethical, cultural, and policy issues; national and international legal issues; telemedicine, medical and industrial applications; evaluation of quality of service.

650 Development Frameworks for Information Systems Applications (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 501, 515 and 590; or equivalent. Principles and methods of building commercial applications within a high-level framework. Tools for system construction are considered, along with a variety of programming languages, component integration, and design methods. Applications are investigated through program construction in varied settings, such as database systems, graphical user interfaces, and prototyping. Programming projects are required.

697 Topics in Information Systems (1-6:1-6:0) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Special topics in information systems not occurring in the regular INFS sequence are presented. May be repeated for credit when distinct offerings of the course differ in subject.

740 Database Programming for the World Wide Web (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 614. Information systems accessible through the World Wide Web and the Internet are becoming prevalent. This class will focus on technologies and industry standards for accessing and manipulation of persistent data that are suitable for WWW applications.

750 Application Frameworks for Windowed Information Systems (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 601 and 650. Studies the use of object-oriented visual application frameworks in building event-driven windowed systems. Topics include windowed systems as event-driven systems; central architecture of windowed systems and the encapsulation of windowed architectures by object-oriented frameworks; and analysis and design of windowed applications. The various features of visual application frameworks will be illustrated using a variety of information systems applications. Programming projects.

755 Data Warehousing and Mining (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 614 or equivalent. The course covers techniques for designing and maintaining large data warehouses. Topics covered are OLAP, star schemas, data integration, data cleaning, maintenance of views in the presence of updates to the sources, and query processing of warehouses. The second part of the course focuses on mining data from the warehouses. Topics include data mining techniques such as classification, clustering, association rules, mining of time-series and complex data. The emphasis is on scalability over large data sets.

760 Advanced Database Management (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 614. Study of advanced database models and languages, database design theory, transaction processing, recovery, concurrency, distributed database, security and integrity. Recent developments and research directions are discussed.

764 Object-Oriented Database Systems (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 614 or CS 650, or permission of instructor. The knowledge of an object-oriented programming language such as C++ is highly desirable. Study of concepts and systems of object-oriented (OO) databases. Topics include OO design, data models, query languages, new data types, and implementation. Also included are a detailed case study and a project performed on OO-DBMS. Various prototypes, commercially available systems, and emerging standards are surveyed.

770 Knowledge Management for E-Business (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 622 or permission of instructor. Knowledge management within the context of large organizations, particularly those that conduct business on the web and over the Internet. Topics include knowledge management (KM) process model and lifecycle; case studies of effective KM in organizations; e-business frameworks and models, including business-to-consumer, business-to-business, and net marketplaces; the extensible markup language (XML) and its use in e-business transactions and services; the role of standards in effecting inter-enterprise process models and workflows; the intelligent integration and interchange of information among business partners; web service architectures and standards; and security and digital rights management in e-business environments.

785 Data Mining for Homeland Security (3:3:0) Prerequisites: INFS 755. Covers analytic techniques that can be used for investigative analysis. Topics include small world graphs and as a way to model groups and organizations, relational data mining with emphasis in predictive models, alias discovery techniques, and profiling.

790 Information Systems Policy and Administration (3:3:0) Prerequisites: completion of all core courses, and preferably taken in final semester prior to graduation. Capstone course that integrates the technical and executive policy issues of information systems. Critical executive issues are examined through case studies and a comprehensive individual project. No substitutions can be made for this class.

795 Special Topics in Data Mining Applications (3:3:0) Prerequisite: INFS 755. Focuses in the interdisciplinary applications of data mining. Topics are selected from the following: web and text data mining, e-commerce, bioinformatics, security and intelligence analysis, data mining of economical data. Each topic will be analyzed in depth and the state-of-the-art techniques in the application of data mining to the field will be extensively covered.

796 Directed Readings in Information Technology (3:3:0) Prerequisite: graduate standing in information systems with at least 12 prior credit hours in MS. Research and analysis of a contemporary problem in information system development. Prior approval is required by a faculty sponsor who supervises the studentÕs work. Written report is required. A maximum of 6 credits may be earned. To register, students must complete an independent study form, which is available in the department office. It must be initialed by faculty sponsor and approved by department chairman.

797 Advanced Topics in Information Systems (3:3:0) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Special advanced topics not occurring in the regular INFS sequence. May be repeated for credit when distinct offerings of the course differ in subject.

798 Research Project (3:3:0) Prerequisite: 18 credits applicable toward MS. Research project chosen under the guidance of a full-time graduate faculty member, resulting in a written technical report. Prior approval required by a faculty sponsor who supervises the studentÕs work. To register, students must complete an independent study form, which is available in the department office. It must be initialed by faculty sponsor and approved by department chairman.

799 Thesis (1-6:0:0)Prerequisite: 18 credits applicable toward MS. Original or compilary work evaluated by a committee of three faculty members. To register, students must complete an independent study form, which is available in the department office. It must be initialed by faculty sponsor and approved by department chairman.