George Mason University 1997-98 Catalog Catalog Index
Course Descriptions

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English Courses (ENGL)



English

Three credit hours of a 100-level English course are prerequisite to all 200-level courses; three credit hours of a 100-level English course and six credit hours of 200-level English courses are prerequisite to all English courses numbered above 302. Any two English courses on the 200 level, taken in any order, may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in literature. Nonnative speakers of English with limited proficiency in the language are encouraged to take ENGL 100 instead of ENGL 101. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 100 and ENGL 101.

100 Composition for Nonnative Speakers of English (4:4:0). For nonnative speakers of English with limited proficiency in the language. Expository writing, ranging from paragraphs to essays of some length and complexity. Study of the logical, rhetorical, and linguistic structure of expository prose, with attention to particularly difficult aspects of the language for nonnative speakers. Methods and conventions of preparing research papers. Students must attain a minimum grade of C to fulfill degree requirements.

101 Composition (3:3:0). ENGL 101 (or 100) is prerequisite to all 200-level and above English courses. Expository writing, ranging from paragraphs to essays of some length and complexity. Study of the logical, rhetorical, and linguistic structure of expository prose. Methods and conventions of preparing research papers. Students must attain a minimum grade of C to fulfill degree requirements.

201 Reading Texts (3:3:0). Close analysis of texts, including but not limited to poetry, fiction, and drama. Emphasis upon reading and writing exercises to develop basic interpretive skills. Examination of figurative language, central ideas, relationship between structure and meaning, narrative point of view, etc., and of the roles of context in shaping these.

202 Texts and Contexts (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 201 or permission of department. Study of texts within the framework of culture. Examination of texts within such categories as history, gender, sexuality, religion, race, class, and nation. Builds on reading and writing skills taught in ENGL 201.

203, 204 Western Literary Masterworks (3:3:0), (3:3:0). Great works of Western civilization. ENGL 203 focuses on writers such as Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Dante, Cervantes, Machiavelli, and Montaigne. ENGL 204 covers writers such as Racine, Moliere, Flaubert, Dostoyevski, Tolstoy, Mann, Malraux, Ionesco, and Beckett. All readings in modern English.

205, 206 Readings in English and American Literature (3:3:0), (3:3:0). English and American literature by genres. ENGL 205 focuses on selected English and American poetry and drama by such writers as Marlowe, Shakespeare, Shaw, O'Neill, Albee, Keats, Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, Eliot, and Auden. ENGL 206 focuses on selected English and American novels, short stories, and essays by such writers as Lawrence, Hemingway, Faulkner, Melville, Crane, E. Bronte, Fitzgerald, and Woolf.

207, 208 Literature and Society I, II (3:3:0), (3:3:0). Study of the way in which literature has explored questions of continuing primary importance. Works are selected principally from English and American literature and a variety of genres is considered. ENGL 207 addresses a complex of related issues found in such topics as individuality, community, gender relationships, technology, social conflict, or war and considers how these issues are explored in the literature of at least two historical periods before the present. Each section of ENGL 208 deals intensively with a single topic as represented in the literature of a single historical moment.

251 Survey of English Literature I (3:3:0). Major movements and works of English literature focusing on the writings of such authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and others.

252 Survey of English Literature II (3:3:0). Major movements and works of English literature, focusing on the writings of such authors as Wordsworth, Tennyson, Eliot, the Brownings, Dickens, Yeats, Woolf, and others.

253 Survey of American Literature I (3:3:0). Major movements and works of American literature to 1877, focusing on the writings of such authors as Franklin, Bradstreet, Poe, Emerson, Whitman, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, Stowe, and others.

254 Survey of American Literature II (3:3:0). Major movements and works of American literature after 1877, focusing on such writers as Twain, Chopin, O'Neill, Frost, Faulkner, Stevens, Wharton, Olsen, and others.

302 Advanced Composition (3:3:0). Prerequisites: Completion of 45 credit hours, three credits of composition, and six hours of literature. Intensive practice in writing and analyzing such expository forms as the essay, article, proposal, and technical or scientific report. The Schedule of Classes designates particular sections of ENGL 302 in the following broad areas: business, humanities, natural sciences, social sciences. Students must attain a minimum grade of C to fulfill degree requirements.

309 Independent Writing (3:3:0). Not to be taken concurrently with ENGL 489. Practice in analyzing and writing such expository forms as the essay, memo, article, and technical and scientific reports, depending on the needs of the individual student. (Not a remedial course.)

311 Writing Ethnography (3:3:0). Study and practice of ethnographic writing. Students conduct ethnographic investigations and practice journal keeping, fieldnote recording, interviewing, transcription, and interpre-tation. Includes introduction to current issues in ethnographic writing.

325 Dimensions of Literature (6:6:0). Intensive study of the basic concepts, questions, and assumptions of the study of literature. All sections address the study of genre and of literary history. Other issues such as author; region; ethnic, racial, and sexual groups; and oral and popular culture are addressed in various sections of the course. Open to all majors; required of all English majors. A minimum grade of C is required.

326 General Linguistics (3:3:0). Introduction to general linguistics: phonics, phonemics, morphology, and syntax.

327 Introduction to Cultural Studies (3:3:0). An introduction to the interpretive practices associated with the field of Cultural Studies.

332 Introduction to Film (3:3:0). Introduction to film medium as an art form.

333 American Folklore (3:3:0). Topics include folktales, personal narratives, legends, proverbs, jokes, folksongs, folk art, folk craft, and folk architecture. Consideration of ethnicity, community, family, festival, folklore in literature, and oral history. Discussion of traditions in students' own lives.

334 Literary Approaches to Popular Culture (3:3:0). Emphasis on popular fiction and adaptation of popular prose genres to media that have strong verbal and visual elements. Relationship between verbal and nonverbal elements of such media as film, comics, and radio.

335, 336 Shakespeare (3:3:0), (3:3:0). Twenty selected plays: first semester emphasizes histories and comedies; second semester, tragedies and romances.

337 Special Topics in Myth and Literature (3:3:0). Study of the ways in which the traditional mythologies have been reflected in English and American literature and other texts as themes, motifs, and patterns. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

338 Cultural Constructions of Sexualities (3:3:0). Introductory survey of cultural, literary, and theoretical constructions of sexuality that seeks to complicate traditionally fixed categories of identity. Examination of various representations of human sexuality, with particular attention to its intersections with gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, and class.

340 American Visions (3:3:0). Survey of influential and representative American cultural texts that attempt to define the American community and the struggle of subordinate groups for fuller participation in the life of the nation. Emphasis on the close analysis of primary texts, especially literary works, and their relationship to the larger cultural context.

360, 363 Special Topics in Literature (3:3:0), (3:3:0). Study of literature by topics, such as women in literature, science fiction, and literature of the avant garde. Topic changes each time the course is offered. May be repeated with permission of department.

369 Women and Literature (3:3:0). An exploration of the experience of women as both authors of and subjects in imaginative literature. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

370 Foundations of African American Literature (3:3:0). Beginning with the poetry of Phillis Wheatley and such texts as David Walker's Appeal (1829), this course is a study of significant voices of the 19th century in African American literature, such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Harriet Wilson, William Wells Brown, Charles Chesnutt, Frances Harper, and Paul Laurence Dunbar.

371 African American Literature of the 20th Century (3:3:0). Significant works of poetry, fiction, drama, and autobiography written by American black writers in the 20th century and reflecting the black experience. Works by such authors as Toomer, Hughes, Wright, Brooks, Ellison, Baraka, and Bullins.

380 Recent American Fiction (3:3:0). American short story writers and novelists from World War II to the present, with emphasis on Mailer, Barth, Hawkes, Cheever, Oates, Gass, and Kosinski.

390 Recent American Poetry (3:3:0). Major American poets from World War II to the present, with emphasis on the work of such poets as Roethke, Wilbur, Brooks, Rich, Dickey, Lowell, Merwin, Kinnell, and Ammons.

396 Introduction to Creative Writing (3:3:0). Introduction to the theory and practice of creative writing in poetry, fiction, and drama.

397 Poetry Writing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 396 or permission of instructor. Workshop course in reading and writing poetry. Original student work is read and discussed in class and in conferences with the instructor. Includes technical exercises in the craft of poetry and may include reading assignments.

398 Fiction Writing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 396 or permission of instructor. Workshop course in reading and writing fiction. Original student work is read and discussed in class and in conferences with the instructor. Includes technical exercises in the craft of fiction and may include reading assignments.

400 Literature of the Middle Ages (3:3:0). Selected English narrative, dramatic, and homiletic literature written between 1300 and 1500, exclusive of Chaucer.

401 English Poetry and Prose of the 16th Century (3:3:0). Poetry and prose of the early Renaissance in England.

402 English Poetry and Prose of the 17th Century (3:3:0). English poetry and prose from 1603 to 1688, excluding Milton.

404 The Augustan Age (3:3:0). English literature from the late 17th century to the middle of the 18th century. Emphasis on works of Dryden, Swift, and Pope.

405 The Age of Sensibility (3:3:0). English literature of the later 18th century, the time of the American and French revolutions, including new developments in the novel, biography, and poetry. Emphasis on Johnson, Boswell, and Blake, with some attention to several of the following: Goldsmith, Sterne, Gray, Cowper, Fanny Burney, Burke, William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

406 English Poetry of the Romantic Period (3:3:0). Works of the major poets of the Romantic period: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

407 Prose and Poetry of the Victorian Period (3:3:0). Poetry and nonfiction prose by such authors as Carlyle, Arnold, Tennyson, Browning, Ruskin, and Mill.

408 Special Topics: British Literary Periods (3:3:0). An in-depth study of a selected period of British literature. In addition to literary examples, materials may be chosen from the art, philosophy, or popular culture of the time. When subtitle is different, may be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

410 Technical and Report Writing (3:3:0). Prerequisites: Six credits of composition, including ENGL 302, and six credits in literature; or permission of the extended studies program. Intensive study and practice in various forms of technical writing, including formal and informal reports, proposals, and technical correspondence. Emphasis on writing for a variety of audiences, both lay and informed, and on writing within various professional and organizational contexts.

414 Honors Seminar (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Emphasizing growth in the student's awareness of literary scholarship as a discipline, the honors seminars provide an opportunity for advanced study in literary and cultural criticism. Courses cover a variety of topics, including the consideration of a literary period, genre, author, work, theme, discourse, or critical theory. Course may be repeated for credit.

415 Honors Thesis Writing Seminar (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Permission of the department and ENGL 415. Course gives students who wish to write an English honors thesis the guidance in literary research methods, while allowing them the opportunity to share and critique one anothers' work-in-progress in a workshop format. Students take the thesis seminar concurrently and in coordination with a second literature course offered by the English Department.The thesis of about 30 pages explores an area covered by the second course, and the instructor in that course serves as a reader and adviser to the thesis. Students receive credit for both the thesis seminar and the second literature course; however, thesis work may substitute for some assigned work in the second course, by arrangement of the instructors of the thesis seminar and the second course.

421 Topics in Film History (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 332 or permission of instructor. Advanced studies of the development of film language, both as a cultural practice and as a medium for formal innovation. Topics might include studies of national cinemas, historical periods, genres, or individual directors. May be repeated once for credit when topic is distinctly different.

422 Topics in Film Theory (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 332 or permission of instructor. Advanced studies of theories about various aspects of the production, distribution, and reception of film-mediated experiences. Topics might include theories of the spectator, semiotics, feminist film theory, theories of narrativity, structuralist film theory, and/or deconstruction. May be repeated once for credit when topic is distinctly different.

423 Colonial and Federalist American Literature (3:3:0). The works of the first 200 years of American literature, including Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Cooper, and Bryant.

425 Literature of the American Renaissance (3:3:0). Major writers of the American Renaissance (1830-1865), with emphasis on the works of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Poe.

429 Special Topics: American Literary Periods (3:3:0). In-depth study of a selected period of American literature. In addition to literary examples, materials may be chosen from the art, philosophy, or popular culture of the time. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

431/HIST 431/LANG 431 Medieval Intellectual Topics (3:3:0). May be taken for credit by English or history or area studies majors. Examination of a selected topic in the intellectual history of the Middle Ages. Specific topic may vary. The primary emphasis is literary or historical, depending on the discipline of the instructor. Relevant material drawn from philosophy, theology, and art may be considered.

436 Selected Continental Novels in Translation (3:3:0). Selected European novels in translation. Course focus is the continental novel from the 18th century to the end of the 19th century, and includes works of such writers as Balzac, Gogol, Stendhal, Turgenev, Flaubert, Dostoyevski, Tolstoy, and Galdos.

437 Selected Continental Novels in Translation (3:3:0). Course focus is the continental novel from the beginning of the 20th century to the present and includes such writers as Proust, Mann, Gide, Silone, Kafka, Sartre, Cela, Moravia, and Grass. Attention to the influence of this literature on the novel in English. (Offered in cooperation with the Department of Modern and Classical Languages.)

439 Special Topics: Non-British or American Literature (3:3:0). Study of selected topics, periods, genres, or authors in Commonwealth or in Oriental literatures. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

440 English Renaissance Drama (3:3:0). Major dramas and dramatists of the English Renaissance, such as Jonson, Lyly, Marlowe, Middleton, Webster, and Ford.

443 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama (3:3:0). Restoration comedy of manners, sentimental comedy, neoclassical and bourgeois tragedy. Theories of drama and conventions of staging. Writers such as Wycherley, Behn, Congreve, and Cowley.

445 English and Irish Drama of the 20th Century (3:3:0). English and/or Irish drama from Yeats to the present. Plays by authors such as Yeats, Synge, O'Casey, Osborne, Wesker, Pinter, Friel, Churchill, and Gems.

447 American Drama of the 20th Century (3:3:0). American drama of the 20th century with special attention to playwrights such as Susan Glaspell, Eugene O'Neill, Jane Bowles, Arthur Miller, Megan Terry, Tennessee Williams, Irene Fornes, and Edward Albee.

448 Modern Drama (3:3:0). Representative plays of the major and most influential European and American dramatists, with emphasis on dramatic styles such as realism, expressionism, epic, and existentialism. Authors such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Brecht, and Beckett are studied.

449 Special Topics in Drama (3:3:0). Study in depth of selected topics, periods, or playwrights. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

450 English Novel of the 18th Century (3:3:0). The English novel from its beginnings through the turn of the 19th century. Works by such authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Smollett, Scott, and Austen.

452 Development of the American Novel to 1914 (3:3:0). Major American novels of the pre-World War I period with emphasis on the work of Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Dreiser, Norris, and others.

453 English Novel of the 19th Century (3:3:0). The English novel of the 19th century. Works by such authors as Dickens, Thackeray, E. Bronte, Eliot, Trollope, Meredith, and Hardy.

454 Development of the American Novel Since 1914 (3:3:0). The American novel from the end of World War I to the present, including works by such authors as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Dos Passos, Wolfe, Bellow, and Nabokov.

456 English Novel of the 20th Century (3:3:0). The English novel from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Works by such authors as Conrad, Ford, Bennett, Forster, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Huxley, Greene, and others.

458 Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3:3:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 397 or 398 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Students must submit a typed manuscript at least one week before registration. A workshop course: intensive practice in creative writing and study of the creative process. Intended for students already writing original creative work. (By permission of instructor, may be taken a second time for credit; the additional three hours, however, may not be counted toward the requirement for the English major. No more than a combined total of nine hours may be taken in ENGL 458, 464, 497.)

459 Special Topics in Fiction (3:3:0). Study in depth of selected topics, periods, or authors. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

462 English Poetry of the 20th Century (3:3:0). English poetry from 1900 to present; emphasis on work of Hardy, Yeats, Lawrence, Graves, Auden, Thomas, and Hughes. A work of fiction employing poetic techniques, such as Joyce's Ulysses, may also be studied.

463 American Poetry of the 20th Century (3:3:0). Emphasis on the work of Robinson, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Pound, Crane, Eliot, and Lowell. A work of fiction employing poetic techniques, such as Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, may also be studied.

464 Advanced Poetry Workshop (3:3:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 397 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Students must submit a typed manuscript at least one week before registration. Intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the imagination in the creative process. Intended for students already writing original poetry. At the discretion of the instructor, technical exercises and assigned reading may be required. (By permission of instructor, may be taken a second time for credit; the additional three hours, however, may not be counted toward the requirement for the English major. No more than a combined total of nine hours may be taken in ENGL 458, 464, 497.)

468 Special Topics in Poetry (3:3:0). Study in depth of selected topics, periods, or poets. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

471 Chaucer (3:3:0). The major works of Chaucer, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales.

472 Spenser (3:3:0). Poetry of Edmund Spenser, with central emphasis on The Faerie Queene.

473 Special Studies in Shakespeare (3:3:0). Study in depth of one aspect of Shakespeare's art or critical issues surrounding his work. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

474 Milton (3:3:0). Milton's major poetic works, with emphasis on Paradise Lost.

477 Special Topics: British Authors (3:3:0). Study of one or two major figures in British literature. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

478 Special Topics: American Authors (3:3:0). Study of one or two major figures in American literature. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

489 Advanced Nonfiction Writing (3:3:0). Theory and practice of advanced nonfiction writing, with emphasis on writing for publication. Occasional special topics sections in such forms as autobiography and scientific writing. Prior credit for ENGL 309 recommended. May not be taken concurrently with ENGL 309.

490 Special Topics in Film (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 332 or permission of instructor. American and foreign films selected by type, period, or director with the emphasis varying from year to year. Required viewings, student discussion, and written critiques. May be repeated with permission of department.

491 Special Topics in Folklore (3:3:0). An exploration of various aspects of folklore and folklife such as folklore and literature, folk arts, folk song, and material culture. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

492 Science Fiction (3:3:0). Major works of science fiction in terms of mode, themes, and narrative techniques, especially the role of hypothesis in science fiction. Focus on novels and short stories from the early nineteenth century to the present.

493 Special Topics in Popular Literature (3:3:0). Study of a specific topic or theme in popular literature. May be repeated once for credit when subtitle is different, with permission of department.

494 Special Topics in Criticism (3:3:0). Study in depth of a selected approach to literary criticism, as announced, with exercises in critical analysis. Examples: new criticism, structuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism. May be repeated with permission of department.

495 Literary Modes (3:3:0). Theory and practice of such modes as tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy, romance and satire, considered in separate semesters and drawn from a variety of periods ranging from biblical times to the present, with examples from drama, poetry, and fiction. May be repeated with permission of department.

496 Special Topics: British or American Literature (3:3:0). Study in depth of a selected literary topic, period or genre, as announced. May be repeated with permission of department.

497 Special Topics in Creative Writing (3:3:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 397 or 398 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Students must submit a typed manuscript at least one week before they intend to register. For specific guidelines, consult the department's Course Description Booklet, the instructor, or the department secretaries. A workshop course: intensive practice in creative writing and study of the creative process. The course concentrates on a specialized literary type other than the short story or poetry (for example, playwriting, screenwriting, children's literature, travel literature, autobiography, the gothic novel, translation) and the concentration is announced in the department's Course Description Booklet before preregistration. Intended for students already writing original creative work. (By permission of instructor, may be taken a second time for credit; the additional three hours, however, may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. No more than a combined total of nine hours may be taken in ENGL 464, 458, 497.)

499 Independent Study (1-3:0:0). Prerequisites: Permission of department and permission of instructor. Open only to English majors with 90 hours and 15 hours in 300- and 400-level courses. Intensive study of a particular author, genre, period, or critical or theoretical problem in literature or linguistics, to be conducted by an individual student in close consultation with an instructor. The student produces at least one substantial piece of written work during the semester on the findings of his or her research. (By permission of department, the course may be taken twice for a maximum of six hours of credit.) (With permission of department, qualified undergraduates may enroll in 500-level courses either for undergraduate or reserved graduate credit.)

503 Theory and Practice of Editing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of English courses numbered above 300, including one advanced writing course¬309, 311, 397, 398, 458, 464, 489, 497¬or permission of department. Instruction in revising, editing, and preparing specialized writing for printing. Emphasis on methods of achieving clarity, accuracy, and completeness. Lecture and discussion on editing and printing techniques, practical exercise in revision, layout, and production.

504 Internship in Writing and Editing (3:0:0). Prerequisite: Open to senior English majors and graduate students pursuing the M.A. in English or the M.F.A. Contact the English Department one semester prior to enrollment. Internships are approved work-study positions in writing or editing established by the English Department with specific employers. Variable credit. Variable prerequisites.

505 Computer­Assisted Publications Writing and Design (3:3:0). Theory and practice of using computer programs to design and produce publications including brochures, fliers, newsletters, and small magazines. Course work includes readings, writing papers, and producing and editing copy and original publications.

507 Internship in Applied Linguistics (3:0:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 326, 520, 521, or 582. Contact the English Department one semester prior to enrollment. Internships provide experience working in a language-teaching program or an educational research organization.

511 Styles and Modes in Literary History (3:3:0). Prerequisites: 15 hours of advanced undergraduate English courses and permission of department, or a baccalaureate degree. A historical consideration of some of the principal styles, modes, and intellectual paradigms in literary and cultural texts.

512 (PHIL 512) Issues in Literature and Philosophy (3:3:1). Prerequisites: Graduate or senior standing, six hours of upper-level English, six hours of philosophy, and permission of instructor. An interdisciplinary seminar that offers students an opportunity to arrive at a personal synthesis of work previously done in philosophy and literature. The topic will change yearly but will focus on themes or methodologies common to both disciplines.

513 Advanced Special Topics in English (3:3:0). Prerequisites: 15 hours of advanced undergraduate English courses and permission of department, or a baccalaureate degree. An intensive study of selected topics involving literary and/or other texts (e.g., film, television, opera folklore). May be repeated for credit once with permission of department.

514 (CL 514) Theories of Comparative Literature (3:3:0). Prerequisite: CL 300 and senior standing, or baccalaureate degree, or permission of instructor. An intensive study of the major theories of comparative literature with special emphasis on international movements and their characteristic themes. Students work with texts in the foreign language of their competence; other texts are studied in translation.

520 Descriptive Linguistics (3:3:0). Introduction to the terminology and methodology of modern linguistic science and a detailed structural analysis of English phonology, morphology, and syntax.

521 Applied Linguistics: Teaching English as a Second Language (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 520, 690, or 786. Theories and basic principles of the acquisition of a second language, especially as they relate to the English language, supplying students with methods of teaching English to speakers of other languages.

522 Modern English Grammar (3:3:0). Prerequisite: One course in linguistics or permission of instructor. Overview of the structure of modern English beginning with word classes and ending with analyses of complex sentences. Most topics are introduced as problems of language description; in solving them, principles of syntactic argumentation are demonstrated as well. Students learn to tap their own intuitions about English to analyze grammatical structure.

523 Descriptive Aspects of English Phonetics and Phonology (3:3:0). An in-depth description and analysis of the sound system processes of modern English. Segmental phonetics, syllable structure, connected speech, and prosodic phenomena are among the topics. Implications for language instruction are also addressed.

551 Literary Criticism (3:3:0). Studies of major critical theories and techniques with emphasis on the 20th century.

564 Form of Poetry (3:3:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 464 or equivalent and permission of instructor, except for M.F.A. Students in the concentration. Students must submit a typed manuscript of original poetry at least one week before they intend to register. For specific guidelines, consult the department's Course Description Booklet, the instructor, or the department secretaries. Intensive study of and practice in the formal elements of poetry through the analysis of models and weekly or biweekly writing assignments. Intended for students already writing original poetry. Students study rhyme, meter, rhythm and other musical elements of poetry, lineation, stanza pattern, traditional and experimental forms, free verse and open-form composition, lyric, narrative, and dramatic modes.

566 Form of Fiction (3:3:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 458 or equivalent and permission of instructor, except for M.F.A. Students in the concentration. Students must submit a typed manuscript of original fiction at least one week before they intend to register. For specific guidelines, consult the department's Course Description Booklet, the instructor, or the department secretaries. Intensive practice in the formal elements of fiction, through the analysis of models and weekly or biweekly writing assignments. Intended for students already writing original fiction. Students study description, narration, plot, dialogue, voice, point of view, style, epiphany, and antifiction techniques.

581/PSYC 581 Psycholinguistics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 481, 520, 690, or 786, or permission of instructor. Study of mental and psychological aspects of human language, including aphasia, association, autism, language acquisition, verbal concept formation, and perception.

582 Second Language Acquisition (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 481, 520, 690, or 786, or permission of instructor. Second language (L2) acquisition examined from a linguistic perspective. First and second language acquisition are compared, and factors contributing to L2 variation are explored, including linguistic universals, transfer, age, input, and effective considerations.

592 Historical Studies of the English Language (3:3:0). Either (1) a chronological survey of the development of English from Old and Middle English to Modern English and American English; or (2) an intensive study of the grammar and syntax of Old English as a literary language in representative texts of the period. May be repeated for credit with permission of the department.

610 Proseminar in Teaching the Reading of Literature (3:3:0). Methods of teaching literature. Includes study of methods of literary analysis and ways of developing student responses to literature, with some classroom practice. (Does not satisfy Virginia certification requirement in diagnostic or developmental reading.)

611 Studies in Rhetoric (3:3:0). Reading and discussion of several major texts that address patterns of discourse, communication, and other issues of rhetoric. Content varies. Recent offerings included 20th-century rhetoric and computers and rhetoric. May be repeated for credit with permission of the department.

612 Cultures of Professional Writing (3:3:0). A course for students in the Professional Writing and Editing M.A. in English. Students will work as ethnographers, studying selected sites where people write professionally and analyze the ways in which the production and reception of writing both contribute to and result from the local culture of each site.

613 Technical and Scientific Writing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 616 or permission of department. Intensive study of theory and practice of technical and scientific writing, with emphasis on writing for a variety of audiences. Focus on writing and evaluating formal reports, articles for lay as well as technical audiences, proposals, theses, manuals, and other forms of technical prose.

614 Internship in the Teaching of Writing (1-3:0:0). Internships provide experience working in a teaching program such as in a school or writing center. Students, under the direction of a faculty member, must secure the cooperation of the on-site supervisor. Students work a minimum of three hours per week per credit hour to be awarded, keep a weekly reflective and analytical log, and communicate regularly with the faculty director. Not repeatable for credit.

615 Proseminar in Composition Instruction (3:3:0). Methods of teaching expository writing. Includes consideration of planning of courses, practice in teaching and in grading papers, and study of lab method of instruction.

616 The Writing of Nonfiction (3:3:0). Prerequisite: permission of instructor, except for M.A. and M.F.A. candidates in English. Writing of original essays, biographies, documentaries, reports, and other forms of nonfiction.

617 Poetry Writing Workshop (1-6:1-6:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 564, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of instructor, except for M.F.A. Students in the concentration. Intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the creative process. Intended for students already familiar with traditional and contemporary poetic modes and already writing original poetry. At the discretion of the instructor, reading may be required. May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

618 Fiction Writing Workshop (1-6:1-6:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 566, which may be taken concurrently, and permission of instructor, except for M.F.A. Students in the concentration. Intensive practice in the craft of fiction and study of the creative process. Intended for students already familiar with traditional and contemporary fiction and already writing original fiction. At the discretion of the instructor, reading may be required. May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

619 Special Topics in Writing (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Two graduate writing courses and/or permission of instructor, except for M.F.A. Students in the concentration. A workshop course; intensive practice in creative writing and study of the creative process. Concentrates on a specialized literary type other than the short story (i.e., the essay, playwriting, film writing, children's literature, travel literature, autobiography, the gothic novel, translation); the concentration is announced in the department's Course Description Booklet. Intended for students already writing original creative work. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

625 British Medieval (3:3:0). Selected literary author(s), works or movements from between 1300 and 1500, studied in Middle English. Content varies. May be repeated twice for credit with permission of department.

630 Early Modern (3:3:0). Selected literary author(s), works, or movements of the English Renaissance. Content varies. May be repeated three times for credit with permission of department.

635 Eighteenth Century British (3:3:0). Selected English literary author(s), works, or movements of the 18th century. Content varies. May be repeated twice for credit with permission of department.

640 Nineteenth Century British (3:3:0). Selected English literary author(s), works, or movements of the 19th century. Content varies. May be repeated twice for credit with permission of department.

645 Twentieth Century British (3:3:0). Selected English literary author(s), works, or movements of the 20th century. Content varies. May be repeated twice for credit with permission of department.

650 Seventeenth-18th Century American (3:3:0). Selected literary author(s), works, or movements of the "new world" before 1800. Content varies. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

655 Nineteenth Century American (3:3:0). Selected American literary author(s), works, or movements of the 19th century. Content varies. May be repeated twice for credit with permission of department.

660 Twentieth Century American (3:3:0). Selected American literary author(s), works, or movements of the 20th century. Content varies. May be repeated twice for credit with permission of department.

670 Visual Culture: Theories and Histories (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Introductory film course or permission of instructor. Advanced study in histories of visual representation (including film, television, and video) and in theories of the production and circulation of meanings in visual culture. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

675 Feminist Theory and Criticism (3:3:0). Seminar designed to present a historically based introduction to the major debates within feminist theory and criticism. Stressing the role of gender in literature and its interpretation, the course explores the diverse collection of feminist interpretive practices.

676 Introduction to Cultural Studies (3:3:0). An advanced introduction to the theoretical practice now known as "cultural studies," with particular attention given to its role in textual studies. The course is part of the interdisciplinary Cultural Studies Ph.D. program, as well as the M.A. in English.

685 Selected Topics, Movements, or Genres of Literature in English (3:3:0). Content varies. May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

686 Special Topics in Linguistics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Varies with topic. Detailed advanced study of selected area of linguistics. Content varies. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

690 Generative Phonology (3:3:0). Sound systems of English and other languages from the perspective of phonological theory. Topics include articulatory phonetics, distinctive features, the nature of phonological representations and processes, rule ordering, abstractness, the role of external evidence, and nonlinear phonology.

691 Theories of Language (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 520, 690, or 786, or permission of instructor. A seminar course in linguistic metatheory. A wide range of theories about language and about linguistic theory are examined, including those of Saussure, Bloomfield, Chomsky, and others. Readings from original sources.

692 Phonology II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 690. Recent trends in phonological theory. Topics include stress assignment, tone spreading, and vowel harmony, from within a nonlinear framework. Segmental structure and underspecification are discussed.

695/EDUC 695 Northern Virginia Writing Project Inservice Program (1,2,3:0:0). Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or permission of department. Offered at the request of a school division or other education agency to assist teachers in improving student writing and the use of writing to learn. Content varies. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department, but no more than six semester hours of credit in ENGL 695, EDUC 695, and/or ENGL 699 may be applied toward a master's degree in English.

696/EDUC 696 Northern Virginia Writing Project Teacher/Research Seminar (3:0:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 695/EDUC 695 or NVWP Summer Institute. Designed to acquaint classroom teachers with current findings related to the composing process and methods of studying writing in a school setting. Focus on development of a proposal investigating some aspect of the composing process. Teachers who have developed a proposal prior to enrolling will conduct the research during the course.

697/EDUC 697 Theory of Composition (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 615, ENGL 695/EDUC 695, or equivalent. Designed to acquaint classroom teachers with current theory relating to writing and the teaching of composition. Focus is on making explicit the theories of the participants, on reading the works of leading theorists, and on developing a statement describing the implications of theoretical consistency in the teaching of writing.

699 Workshop in English (1-3:0:0). Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or permission of department. Concentrated workshops, educational tours, independent studies, and special seminars dealing with selected topics in writing, linguistics, film, the electronic media, and literature written in English. All tours are optional and may be replaced by specified work conducted on campus. May be repeated for credit with permission of the department, but no more than 6 semester hours of credit in ENGL 699 may be applied toward a master's degree in English.

701 Literary Scholarship (3:3:0). An introduction to research in English, including practice in library methods, the writing of a critical bibliography, the evaluation of issues and problems in the discipline, and a survey of scholarly activities in the department.

705 Literary Theory and Criticism (3:3:0). Major theories of literature and methods of analyzing and evaluating literary works. Content varies. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the department.

750 Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing (3:3:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 564 and ENGL 617 and permission of instructor, except for M.F.A. Students in the concentration. Open to M.F.A. Students only. Intensive practice in the craft of poetry for experienced writers. May be repeated for credit with permission of the department.

751 Advanced Workshop in Fiction Writing (1-6:1-6:0). Prerequisites: ENGL 566 and ENGL 618 and permission of instructor, except for M.F.A. Students in the concentration. Open to M.F.A. Students only. Intensive practice in the craft of fiction for experienced writers. May be repeated for credit with permission.

785 Semantics and Pragmatics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 520, 690, or 786, or permission of instructor. Developments in theoretical linguistics which explore how language form is related to meaning and to context. Topics include reference, lexical semantics, logic, quantification, truth conditions and sentential meaning, presuppositions, and speech acts.

786 Syntax I (3:3:0).The nature and form of a syntactic theory, and an examination and analysis of the properties of several major natural language syntactic structures within a contemporary theoretical framework.

787 Syntax II (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ENGL 786. A theoretical treatment of syntactic phenomena that in the past few years have emerged as standard problems for syntactic analysis. Problems include binding, extraction, and quantification. Extensive reading in the primary theoretical literature.

790 Seminar in English/Cultural Studies (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Nine hours of graduate English courses including 701 or permission of department. Analysis of historical shifts in literary and cultural discourse. Major research paper required. Specific topics vary. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

791 Seminar in English/Cultural Studies (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Nine hours of graduate English courses including 701 or permission of department. Analysis of relationships between literary and non-literary elements of a culture within a specific historical moment. Major research paper required. Specific topics vary. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

798 Directed Reading and Research (3:0:0). Prerequisite: Open only to degree students who have completed 15 hours including ENGL 701 and have preregistered. Reading, research, and writing on a specific project under the direction of a department member. Oral or written report required. May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.

799 Thesis (1-6:0:0). Students who take ENGL 798 to develop a thesis topic and then elect the thesis option receive three credits for ENGL 799 upon completion of the thesis. Students who do not take ENGL 798, or who take it to work on a project unrelated to their thesis, receive up to 6 credits for ENGL 799 upon completion of the thesis.

800 Studies for the Doctor of Philosophy in Education (varied credit). Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. in Education program to study in English. Program of studies designed by student's discipline director and approved by student's doctoral committee which prepares the student to do research and writing in the current area of interest of the discipline director. Enrollment may be repeated.

801 New Developments in English (3:3:0). Designed for students in the Doctor of Arts in Community College Education program. Focus is on major original texts that have influenced the discipline of English in the late 20th century. Readings are from literary studies, composition/writing theory, and linguistics.


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