George Mason University 1997-98 Catalog Catalog Index
Course Descriptions

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History Courses (HIST)


101 Foundations of Western Civilization (3:3:0). Evolution of Western culture from the ancient Mediterranean world to the formation of modern Europe in the 17th century.

102 Development of Western Civilization (3:3:0). History of Western institutions and ideas from the 17th century to the present.

121 Formation of the American Republic (3:3:0). Social, political, economic, and intellectual growth of American institutions from colonization through Reconstruction.

122 Development of Modern America (3:3:0). History of the United States since 1877.

130 History of the Modern Global System (3:3:0). The course aims to provide an understanding of the processes that have shaped the modern world. Beginning in 1500, it traces developments that reorganized peoples, reshaped cultures, and generated new economies, in the interaction between Western and Non-Western societies. The focus of the course will be on Western and Non-Western regions of the world, and their participation in the global networks resulting from mercantile expansion, the industrial revolution, imperialism, nationalism, and their legacies in the postcolonial period.

251, 252 Survey of East Asian Civilization (3:3:0), (3:3:0). HIST 251 is a survey of the history of China and Japan from prehistoric times to ca. 1600. HIST 252 is a survey of the history of China and Japan from early modern times (ca. 1600) to the present.

261, 262 Survey of African Civilization (3:3:0), (3:3:0). HIST 261 is a survey of African history from earliest times to the decline of western Sudanic states in the 16th century. HIST 262 is a survey of African history from the beginnings of interaction with Europe in the 15th century to the recent emergence of new states.

271, 272 Survey of Latin-American History (3:3:0), (3:3:0). HIST 271 is a survey of the colonial era to 1825. HIST 272 surveys the development of an independent Latin America since 1825. Emphasis on interactions between the United States and Latin America.

281, 282 Survey of Middle Eastern Civilization (3:3:0), (3:3:0). Survey of Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the present, with an emphasis on processes that led to the emergence of the economic, cultural, social, and political institutions that characterize the region today. HIST 281 will survey the period from the rise of Islam in 570 to the medieval period (ca. 1258). HIST 282 will survey the medieval period (ca. 1258 to present).

300 Introduction to Historical Method (3:3:0). Prerequisite: History majors with 60 hours or permission of instructor. Open to minors with approval of department. Recommended that ENGL 302 be taken prior to or concurrently with HIST 300. Introduction to historical writing, research techniques, and critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources. Topics vary according to instructor. A grade of C or better is required to graduate with a B.A. in History.

301 Classical Greece (3:3:0). Political, social, economic, and cultural history of classical Greece from development of the city-state through the 5th century.

302 Classical Rome (3:3:0). Political, social, economic, and cultural history of classical Rome from founding of the city through fall of the Roman republic.

304 Western Europe in the Middle Ages (3:3:0). Survey of the development of European society from the collapse of Roman rule in the 5th century to the advent of the Black Death in the 14th century. Emphasis is on the political, social, cultural, and intellectual growth of a society that developed from Roman, Catholic, and Germanic roots.

305 The Renaissance (3:3:0). Survey considering the Renaissance as a phenomenon rather than a chronological period. Emphasis on growth of Humanism in Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries, development of new political concepts, and laicization of society. Includes transmission of these developments to transalpine Europe in the late 15th and 16th centuries.

306 The Reformation (3:3:0). Late medieval ecclesiastical conditions and reform movements; late scholasticism; Protestant Reformation, Catholic Reformation, dynastic rivalries, and religious wars. Concludes with the Peace of Westphalia (1648).

308 Nineteenth-Century Europe (3:3:0). History of Europe from Congress of Vienna to outbreak of World War I.

309 Contemporary Europe (3:3:0). Survey of major political changes in Europe since 1914 with emphasis on broad patterns of ideological conflict.

314 History of Germany (3:3:0). Political, diplomatic, economic, social, and cultural development of Germany from the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire to the present.

321 Early Modern England (3:3:0). The history of England from the late 15th to the mid-18th century, focusing on the social, political, economic, and cultural changes of the period with particular attention to the English Reformation and the causes and consequences of the English Civil War.

322 Modern Britain (3:3:0). History of Britain from the mid-18th century to the present. Focus on the social, political, and economic transformations of industrialization, the culture of 19th-century industrial society, the problems of late 19th-century economic competition and imperialism, the creation of the welfare state, and the experience of post-World War II political, social, and economic realignments.

328 Rise of Russia (3:3:0). Political, social, and cultural experience of Russia from the appearance of the Kievan state to the mid-19th century.

329 Modern Russia and the Soviet Union (3:3:0). Analysis of Russian civilization from mid-19th century through the 20th; focus on tsarist society, the revolution, and Soviet politics and the contemporary challenge.

335 The African American Experience in the United States: African Background to 1885 (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of history or permission of instructor. History of African American experience in the United States including African origins; the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade; the development of slavery in the colonial, Revolutionary, and Antebellum periods, abolitionist movements; and African American participation in the Civil War and during Reconstruction.

336 The African American Experience in the United States: Reconstruction to the Present (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of history or permission of instructor. The history of African American life in post-slavery America and the rise and consequences of racial segregation in the19th and 20th centuries. The course examines the African American response to continued racial inequality and repression. The Great migration, urbanization, black nationalism, and the Civil Rights Era, as well as contemporary debates about race are covered.

340 History of American Racial Thought (3:3:0). Introduction to the history of American racial thought, with particular emphasis on the relationship between the social theory and the social practices of racism in American life. The course examines the origins of American racism, the development of 19th-century racial theories, and the 20th-century movement in anthropology that redefined race in cultural terms.

345 History of American Foreign Relations (3:3:0). Survey of American diplomacy from the Revolutionary War to the present, with emphasis on 20th-century issues.

351 History of the Old South (3:3:0). History of the South to the outbreak of the Civil War, with particular emphasis on the rise of sectionalism. Development of a distinct Southern culture through emergence of economic, political, social, agricultural, and intellectual institutions.

352 The South Since 1865 (3:3:0). History of the South during Reconstruction, the Redeemer era and the New South, with particular emphasis on race relations. Political, economic, cultural, and intellectual development from aftermath of war.

353 History of Traditional China (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of history or permission of instructor. China from earliest times to the period of modern Western intrusion. Development of traditional Chinese culture, society, and government.

354 Modern China (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of history or permission of instructor. China from 1644 to the People's Republic of China. Emphasis on the coming of the West and the various stages of Chinese reaction.

356 Modern Japan (3:3:0). Japan from the Meiji Restoration to World War II. Emphasis on Japan's modernization in the face of challenge.

363 The History of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile (3:3:0). Intensive study of evolution of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile from the colonial period to the present with emphasis on changing social, political, and economic conditions.

379 History of Canada (3:3:0). Introduction to history of Canada from French settlement to present. Emphasis on Canada's historical position in the British Empire and Commonwealth, its unique relations with the United States, and issues related to its French-speaking minority.

386 Topics in History (3:3:0). Study of historical topics of special interest. Topics announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.

387 Topics in Global History (3:3:0). Study of historical topics or periods of special interest in global, Latin American, African, Asian, or Middle Eastern history. Topics announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.

388 Topics in European History (3:3:0). Study of historical topics or periods of special interest. Topics announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.

389 Topics in U.S. History (3:3:0). Study of historical topics or periods of special interest. Topics announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.

391 History of Virginia to 1800 (3:3:0). Discovery and settlement of Virginia. Colonial period with emphasis on development of representative government and race relations, the "Golden Age" of the Virginia dynasty, and coming of the Civil War.

392 History of Virginia Since 1800 (3:3:0). Decision to secede, Civil War and Reconstruction, Readjustors and Populism, disfranchisement and Constitution of 1902, rise of Senator Harry F. Byrd. Recent developments.

393 Topics in History through Film (3:3:0). Study of historical periods or topics from perspective of feature films and documentaries. Topics available in advance in History Department. May be repeated when topic is different. Maximum of six hours may be applied toward the history major.

396 History of Western Science: From the Scientific Revolution to the 20th Century (3:3:0). Examination of the foundations and development of scientific thought in Western Europe from the scientific revolution of the 17th century to the 20th century. Emphasis on the historical context of science. No advanced background in mathematics or natural science is required.

401 Colonial America (3:3:0). Intensive study of colonial American history from its European origins through the Revolutionary War.

403 Revolutionary Era in American History, 1763-1812 (3:3:0). Study of formative years of the new republic from the Treaty of Paris of 1783 to the election of 1820.

404 Jacksonian America, 1812-1854 (3:3:0). Study of the age of Andrew Jackson; emphasis on democratic institutions that emerged as dominant influences in American society.

406 The Civil War (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of history or permission of instructor. Course, conduct, and consequences of the American Civil War. Emphasis on interconnectedness of political, military, and economic affairs.

409 Between the Wars: The United States, 1919-1941 (3:3:0). Intensive study of political, social, economic, and diplomatic developments in the 1920s and the 1930s.

410 The United States Since World War II (3:3:0). Examination of major domestic and foreign policy factors that shaped American experience from World War II to the present. Political, social, and economic forces as they affected the nation's history.

413 War and the Military in American Life (3:3:0). Study of impact of war on American society and its influence on the shaping of national policy. Topics include the role of the military in the economy, minorities in the armed forces, development of peace movements.

416 U.S. Urban History (3:3:0). Examination of the process of urbanization in the United States, and the growth of American cities and suburbs from colonial times to the present.

417 History of Metropolitan Washington (3:3:0). Examination of urban and suburban growth in Washington, D.C., and its suburbs in Maryland and Virginia since 1790, in the context of U.S. urban history.

418 Ethnic Groups in America (3:3:0). Exploration of ethnicity and race in American urban society by comparing the experiences of different ethnic groups as migrants to American cities.

431/ENGL 431 Medieval Intellectual Topics (3:3:0). Selected topics in the intellectual history of the Middle Ages. Topics vary, depending on discipline of instructor. May be taken for credit by English, history, or area studies majors.

435 Society and Culture in Early Modern Europe (3:3:0). Examination of the social and cultural lives of Europeans from the end of the Middle Ages to the Industrial Revolution. Popular, as well as elite, culture are emphasized, as are the bridges and interrelationships between them. Focus on religious, artistic, literary, and recreational behavior. In addition, political activity¬riots, strikes, royal receptions, and rituals¬are covered.

436 European Society and Culture; 19th and 20th Centuries (3:3:0). Examination of major cultural trends in Europe since the French Revolution. Major themes include romanticism; socialism; Marxism; the social effect of modernization, science, and societies.

451 The United States and China (3:3:0). History of foreign relations between the United States and China in the 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on causes of their cooperation and conflict.

455/COMM 455 History of Print Journalism (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Three hours COMM or HIST. Development of print journalism from its inception to the present, with emphasis on the interaction of technology, audience, and government intervention. Topics include birth of the press; development of the modern newspaper and American development, including the Revolutionary and Civil Wars; the rise of the independent press; and the Yellow Journalism period.

463 Ancient India and Pakistan (3:3:0). History of Indo-Pakistan subcontinent with special reference to Indus Valley people, Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, and Muslims from ancient to medieval times.

464 Modern India and Pakistan (3:3:0). Political history of the Indo-Pakistan subcontinent from the mid-18th century to the present. Background of earlier cultures of Hindus and Muslims as prelude to developments in modern periods.

465 The Middle East in the 20th Century (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of history or permission of instructor. Political, social, and cultural history of the Middle East since World War I. Emergence of Israel, Arab nationalism, and political and economic influence of the Middle East in world affairs.

466 Origins of Conflict in Southern Africa (3:3:0). Exploration of the historical origins of conflict in South Africa, focusing on themes of economic change, cultural interaction, and political consolidation over the past five centuries.

470 Diplomacy and War in Latin America (3:3:0). Balance of power diplomacy among nation states of Latin America from independence to present. Emphasis on sources of conflict.

475 History of Mexico (3:3:0). Intensive study of Mexican history from pre-Columbian era to present, with emphasis on the national period.

480 Alexander the Great (3:3:0). Rise of Persia, the Persian wars with Greece, subjugation of Greece by Philip II of Macedonia, life of Alexander the Great and his conquest of the Persian empire.

496 Internship (1-6:0:0). Prerequisite: History majors with permission of internship coordinator. Approved work-study programs in cooperation with specific organizations including area museums; archives; historic sites; and local, state, and federal agencies. Credit determined by department.

498 Directed Readings/Research in History (1-3:0:0). Prerequisites: History majors with 90 hours and permission of instructor. Readings/research conducted on an individual basis in consultation with instructor. A student may not present more than three hours for graduation credit.

499 Senior Seminar in History (3:3:0). Prerequisite: History majors with 90 hours, HIST 300, or permission of instructor. Research on a specialized historical topic culminating in a seminar paper. Subject determined by instructor. A student may present not more than three hours for graduation credit. Not offered in the summer.

525 Problems in Latin American History (3:3:0). Analysis of selected problems in Latin American history. Emphasis on reading and discussion of historical interpretations and development of bibliography. Maximum of six hours may be earned.

550 Interpretations of History (3:3:0). Study of development of historical writings in the West from ancient to modern times. Introduction to historical methodology.

555 Problems in Asian History (3:3:0). Subjects announced by instructor. Discussion of readings and historical interpretations and compilation of a comprehensive bibliography on given theme. Maximum of six hours may be earned.

565 Problems in African History (3:3:0). Analysis of selected problems in African history. Emphasis on reading and discussion of historical interpretations and development of bibliography. Course may be repeated once when content differs.

585 Problems in Middle Eastern History (3:3:0). Analysis of selected problems in Middle Eastern history. Emphasis on reading and discussion of historical interpretations and development of bibliography. Course may be repeated once when content differs. Prerequisite to 600-level courses: Graduate standing.

601 Themes in U.S. History I (3:3:0). Survey of U.S. history prior to 1877. Designed for individuals entering the graduate program who need to strengthen their preparation in this area or who seek to enhance their knowledge of the latest interpretations in the field. . Factual knowledge and its interpretation are stressed.

602 Themes in U.S. History II (3:3:0). Survey of U.S. history since 1877. Designed for individuals entering the graduate program who need to strengthen their preparation in this area or who seek to enhance their knowledge of the latest interpretations in the field. . Factual knowledge and its interpretation are stressed.

605 Themes in European History I (3:3:0). Survey of European history from 1500 to 1815. Designed for individuals entering the graduate program who need to strengthen their preparation in this area or who seek to enhance their knowledge of the latest interpretations in the field. . Factual knowledge and its interpretation are stressed.

606 Themes in European History II (3:3:0). Survey of European history from 1815 to present. Designed for individuals entering the graduate program who need to strengthen their preparation in this area or who seek to enhance their knowledge of the latest interpretations in the field. . Factual knowledge and its interpretation are stressed.

610 The Study and Writing of History (3:3:0). Methodology of the historian, including techniques of research, use of documentation and other sources, development of bibliography, and synthesis of material.

613 The Colonial Origins of American Society (3:3:0). Study of evolution of elements in colonial society that affect contemporary American institutions and patterns of behavior.

614 The Enlightenment in America (3:3:0). Study of Enlightenment as it was reflected in various aspects of American life in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Impact of the Enlightenment on development of new American nation.

615 Problems in American History (1-6:1-6:0). Readings and discussion of bibliographies, interpretations, and research trends in topics selected by instructor. Maximum of nine hours may be earned.

616 U.S. Westward Movement (3:3:0). Investigation of continuity and change in the American West, focusing on such topics as economic development, ethnicity, rural and urban life, and the role of the federal government.

617 Topics in the American Civil War Era (3:3:0). Joint project of instructor and students into the various aspects of a common topic in the Civil War era with emphasis on historiography and historical method.

618 The Age of Jackson, 1815-1854 (3:3:0). Survey of the social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and political changes in the United States during a period of rapid growth and expansion. Among the topics studied are the second party system; the growth of sectionalism, nationalism, and expansionism; industrialization and the spread of the market economy; the rise of romantic reform and evangelical religion; and the growth of abolitionist and proslavery movements.

619 The Constitution, Civil Liberties, and the Supreme Court (3:3:0). Investigation of the evolution of civil liberties in American history and the interaction of the three branches of government in applying the various constitutional guarantees. Students read extensively in Supreme Court decisions as well as in the secondary literature, and undertake independent research.

620 Development of the Early Republic, 1783-1815 (3:3:0). Investigation of the breakdown of the Confederation, the Constitutional Convention, and the role of the revolutionary ideology of republicanism. Also, the leadership and policies of the republic in a hostile international context. Students read extensively in the monographic literature and prepare a research paper.

621 Virginia and the American Revolution (3:3:0). A detailed examination of Virginia society on the eve of the American Revolution and its role in the events from 1750 to 1789. The course combines lectures on and discussion of major themes, ideas, and personalities.

622 American Minds (3:3:0). An advanced introduction to major approaches to and themes in American intellectual history, rather than a survey of the subject. Avoids positing an American mind in the beginning and explores instead the diversity of American thinkers. Focuses on several pivotal decades in American thought and sees American thinkers in their social contexts. Also explores how nonelites have shaped American thought. As such, this course provides a diverse and multifarious look at who were the important American minds.

623 Recent U.S. History, 1945 to Present (3:3:0). Selected political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural forces that shaped the post-World War II American experience.

624 U.S. Diplomatic History (3:3:0). Study of selected issues in American foreign relations and changing historical interpretations of American diplomacy.

625 Race in American Life and Thought (3:3:0). Historical examination and impact of nature of American attitudes toward nonwhites. Emphasis on origins and effects of American views of race on our national experience.

627 Urban Development of the United States (3:3:0). Examination of the growth of cities in the United States, the process of urbanization, and the significance of cities in American history. Students become familiar with major issues and bibliography of American urban history.

628 Immigration and Ethnicity in the United States (3:3:0). Examination of immigration and ethnicity in America since 1840. Consideration of why immigrants came, from where, under what circumstances, and the ways in which they adapted to America. Examination of immigration policy and American attitudes toward immigration and ethnicity. Conducted as a readings colloquium.

629 The Gilded Age and Progressive Era (3:3:0). Examines the history of the United States from 1877 to 1918, with attention both to the history of reform movements and politics, and the social history of the period. Students become familiar with major issues and historical literature of the period.

630 U.S. Women's History (3:3:0). Wide-ranging survey of the burgeoning field of women's history, emphasizing critical evaluation of sources and interpretation. Readings are selected to represent a variety of approaches to the history of women, which may include material culture studies, medical history, history of sexuality, political history, and social and cultural history.

631 Era of the American Revolution (3:3:0). This course examines the history and historiography of the revolutionary era, with a special emphasis on the social and ideological interpretations of the period.The period covered includes the events leading up to the War for Independence, the war itself, and the social and political effects of the war on American society.

635 Problems in European History (1-6:1-6:0). Investigation of selected problems in the history of Europe. Readings, discussions, development of bibliographies. Where possible, primary sources are used. Maximum of six hours may be earned.

636 Political Culture in 20th-Century Germany and Austria: Continuities and Discontinuities (3:3:0). Recent interpretations of key political events of the 20th century. Focus on the question, Despite radical political changes, were there fundamental continuities in the structure of German and Austrian society that can be observed throughout the period under review?

637 Great Britain: Empire to Commonwealth, 1870-1970 (3:3:0). Examination of the rise of the "new imperialism" in Great Britain from 1870 to the end of the empire and gradual formation of the Commonwealth of Nations.

638 Western Europe in the Post-War Period (3:3:0). Examination of the process of reconstruction, reconciliation, and integration in Western Europe in the 20 years after the Second World War. Conducted as a readings colloquium.

639 Society and Politics in Western Europe, 1750­1914 (3:3:0). Focus on changes in social conditions and their ramifications in political life. Attention to urbanization of workers, changes in the peasantry, growth of middle classes, decline of nobility, as well as major political developments and expansion of liberal reforms.

642 Humanism and the Renaissance (3:3:0). The Renaissance as a unique period in European cultural history from ca. 1350 to 1520. Concentration on the Italian situation as the standard for the Renaissance, with consideration given to the manifestations of the Renaissance in northern Europe, especially Germany, until the Reformation. Focus on recent studies of political, social, intellectual, and religious changes of the period. Students write class reports and a larger bibliographic paper.

643 Religion and Society in the Reformation Era (3:3:0). The Reformation, from approximately 1500 to 1650, was a time of major religious, intellectual, social, and political upheavals in European history. The course investigates the reasons for these changes and the effects they had on European society. First half of course focuses on Germany, but major events throughout Europe are studied.

644 Society and Culture in Early Modern Europe (3:3:0). Overview of the most recent historical work on social and cultural history of the pre-modern West, ca. 1400 to 1800. Making full use of theoretical approaches and empirical methodologies of other disciplines¬especially social anthropology, sociology, and literary theory¬this research sheds new light on topics as diverse as popular culture, class, manners, taste, rituals, religion, language, gender, and the state. This "new" cultural history not only formulates new topics of research and poses new questions about them, it also suggests an entirely new approach to more traditional historical topics, such as politics, religion, and ideas.

645 The Russian Revolution and the Origins of the Soviet State (3:3:0). The period between 1890 and 1924 with concentration on the sources of Bolshevism, problems of the old regime as they led up to the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, establishment of the new regime, and its survival in an environment of foreign and civil war.

690 The Administration of Archives and Manuscripts (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of U.S. history or permission of department. Introduction to the principles and practices in managing records and administering archival and manuscript collections, public and private. Designed for graduate students with a special interest in historical sources as well as for those specializing in applied history.

691 Museum Studies (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of U.S. history or permission of department. General introduction to museums of history and museum studies in the United States, intended for the interested citizen as well as for assistance to students in course and career choices. The course explores the development, present state, and future possibilities of museums in the United States, with some reference to international developments.

692 Historical Editing (3:3:0). Introduction to the fundamentals of historical editing of documents, including the use of microform, word processing, and computer techniques. Designed for persons seeking an introduction to various areas of applied history and for persons intending to edit historical documents for publication.

693 Historic Preservation (3:3:0). Prerequisite: Six hours of U.S. history or permission of department. General introduction to historic preservation in the United States, intended for the interested citizen as well as for assistance to students in course and career choices. The course explores the development, present state, and future possibilities of historic preservation in the United States, with some reference to international aspects of preservation.

695 History Symposium (3:3:0). Subject of academic and community interest pursued through discussions and lectures by distinguished guest instructors.

711 Research Seminar in U.S. History (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HIST 610 or permission of department. Research in specialized topics using primary sources. Maximum of six hours may be earned.

731 Research Seminar in European History (3:3:0). Prerequisite: HIST 610 or permission of department. Research in specialized topics using primary sources. Maximum of six hours may be earned.

790 Comprehensive Readings in U.S. History (3:3:0). To be taken in the final semester of the program. Designed to integrate the student's past work in the major field and to fill gaps in this area before comprehensive exam. After a review of graduate experience, student and instructor design a reading list to round out preparation for the exam.

792 Comprehensive Readings in European History Since 1500 (3:3:0). To be taken in the final semester of the program. Designed to integrate the student's past work in the major field and to fill gaps in this area before comprehensive exam. After review of graduate experience, student and instructor design a reading list to round out preparation for the exam.

794 Internship in Applied History (3-6:0:0). Prerequisites: Three hours of applied history in appropriate area and 12 hours in major field or permission of internship director. All internship placements must be approved by the department to ensure their suitability to the student's program. An introduction to applied history through work and study at a historical museum, site, library archive, editing project, or other approved agency.

796 Directed Readings (3-6:0:0). Independent reading on a topic agreed to by student and faculty member. Maximum of six hours may be earned.

798 Directed Research and Writing in History (3:3:0). Intended for those students in the department's predoctoral track who are not writing a master's thesis. The goal of the course is to produce a substantial and original contribution to historical knowledge on the model of an article in a scholarly journal.

799 Thesis (1-6:0:0). 800 Studies for the Doctor of Philosophy in Education (various credit). Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. in Education program to study in history. Program of studies designed by student's discipline director and approved by student's doctoral committee, which brings the student to participate in research of discipline director and results in a paper reporting the original contributions of the student. Enrollment may be repeated.

801 New Developments in History (3:3:0). Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or permission of instructor and HIST 610 or equivalent. Survey of current developments in historical analysis and methodology.

802 Readings for Doctor of Arts in Community College Education (varied credit).S Prerequisite: Admission to Doctor of Arts in Community College Education program to study history. Intensive reading of the recent scholarship in broad areas of historical study. With their advisers, students develop the readings list and define at least three areas in which to prepare readings courses. May be repeated.


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