George Mason University 1997-98 Catalog Catalog Index
Course Descriptions

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Biosciences and Biotechnology Courses (MBTI)


Institute for Biosciences, Bioinformatics, and Biotechnology (IB3)/University Programs

The IB3 programs in research and education emerge from the Memorandum of Understanding and Agreement of July 1, 1995, between the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and George Mason University. The institute enables the university to expand its offerings in the areas of bioinformatics, computational biology, and biotechnology related to microbial and eukaryotic genome science. Academic programs, including master's and doctoral degrees in bioinformatics and biotechnology, are developing as a result of the ATCC¬Mason partnership. The following short courses and workshops from the ATCC educational portfolio are offered as the basis for development of the IB3 graduate program. During 1997-98 the program will be integrated with offerings in Biology and Computational Sciences and Informatics. Refer to the Schedule of Classes for updates, or contact the Office of the Director, IB3.

501 Recombinant DNA: Techniques and Applications (2:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Ten hours lecture and 30 hours of laboratory study. A laboratory-intensive course covering the current theory and practice underlying DNA procedures and methodologies. The course provides direct instruction in current recombinant DNA laboratory techniques and their applications in molecular biology. Lecture topics include, but are not limited to molecular cloning, vectors, E. coli and other host genotypes, library construction, nucleic acid sequencing, restriction mapping, probes and PCR, and synthesis and cloning of cDNA. Laboratory sessions involve experimental protocols in characterizing and subcloning DNA fragments and in constructing a genomic library in lambda phage. Laboratory protocols will change to reflect latest advances in techniques and domains of applicability. This course is delivered in five intensive days and is offered during summer school and intersessions at least twice a year.

502 Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR); Applications/Cycle DNA Sequencing (2:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Ten hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory study. A laboratory-intensive course covering applications of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to problems in the theoretical and applied biosciences. The course focus is on current applications, procedures, and problems associated with the use of this versatile technology. Lectures include, but are not limited to, PCR Reaction basics, DNA sequencing, PCR's use in determining taxonomic relationships, PCR fingerprinting, PCR in genetic and disease diagnostics, and current applications of PCR and recombinant DNA methodologies in the biosciences. The course is offered at least twice yearly during summer and intersessions.

503 Hybridoma Technology and MonoClonal Antibody Product Development (2:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Ten hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory study. A laboratory-intensive course covering the principles and practices underlying the production, preservation, and use of MonoClonal antibodies (Mabs) in the theoretical and applied biosciences. This course reflects current practices in the production, use, and preservation of Mabs. Lectures and laboratory sessions focus on the principles and practice of current Hybridoma technologies. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, in-vitro immunization, development of MonoClonal antibodies to difficult antigens, use of immunosuppression, unknown antigens, and cell culture, growth, and collection. Also covered are use of ELISAs in screening and quantifying antigens; principles and optimization of ELISAs; cell fusion, immunoblotting, and Hybridoma screening; bioreactors and Mab production; chemical linkage methods for enzymes, immunogens, and immunoaffinity columns; and cryogenic storage of hybridomas.

504 Insect Cell Culture and Recombinant Protein Expression with Baculovirus Expression Vector System (2:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Ten hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory study. An intensive laboratory-based course in the concepts and practices implicit to insect cell culture and the use of Baculovirus expression vectors to produce recombinant protein. The theoretical and technical concepts and procedures essential to these methodologies are described. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, insect cell culture, Baculovirus biology, generation, detection and purification of recombinant virus, recombinant protein production and post-translational modification, scale-up of Baculovirus expression vector system.

505 Downstream Processing, Recovery, and Purification of Proteins (1:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Eight hours of lecture and 16 hours of laboratory study. A three-day laboratory-intensive course focusing on the problems and methodologies associated with the recovery and purification of proteins from various biological matrixes. Lectures include protein recovery and purification processes; recovery of protein biomass from culture media; centrifugation, tangential flow filtration, cell disintegration, protein precipitation, chromatographic separation and purification technologies, optimization of purification processes, and scale-up and analytical methods. Laboratory work includes flow filtration technologies and applications of gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography in protein isolation and purification protocols.

506 Cell Culture and Hybridomas: Quality Control and Cryopreservation Techniques (1:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Eight hours of lecture and 16 hours of laboratory study. A three-day laboratory-intensive course on the theory and practices essential to cryopreservation of mammalian tissues and Hybridomas. Lectures include cryopreservation theory, cell-banking principles and practice, methods for detecting microbial, mycoplasmal, and viral contaminants, chromosome analysis, isoenzyme and gene probe analysis for cell line identification, and antibody production detection methods. Laboratory techniques include ATCC cell-freezing methodologies, isoenzymology for species determination, cytogenetics, and microbial contaminant testing.

507 Growth and Preservation of Animal Viruses (1:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Six hours of lecture and 18 hours of laboratory study. A three-day laboratory-intensive course providing the theoretical and practical background and technical skills essential to the production and preservation of animal viruses. Lecture topics include, but are not limited to, viral; adsorption, penetration, uncoating, replication, transcription, translation, maturation, and release. Also discussed are inoculation of cell cultures, viral receptors, virus titration; virus effect on host cells; preservation of viruses. Laboratory sessions include egg inoculation, inoculation of cell cultures, virus titration, concentration of virus, harvesting virus from eggs, preservation of entero- and retroviruses.

508 In-Vitro Toxicology: Techniques and Applications (1:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Six hours of lecture and 20 hours of laboratory study. A four-day laboratory-intensive course presenting the current theory and practice underlying in-vitro toxicity assessments. In-vitro approaches to cellular and organ system toxicity testing are discussed using examples from current literature and practice. Criteria for validation of in-vitro toxicity test procedures are examined using a "case study" approach. Topics include, but are not limited to, cytotoxicity strategies in test system development, in-vitro ocular testing, bovine cornea opacity-penetration assays, dermal systems, transepithelial passage, specific organ toxicity, hepatocyte assays.

509 Anaerobic Bacteriology (1:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Seven hours of lecture and 17 hours of laboratory study. A two-day laboratory-intensive course introducing the theory and practices essential to the collection, transport, isolation, and identification of anaerobic bacteria. Methods of identification and recent taxonomic changes are presented. Identification methods include biochemical fermentation systems, specific enzyme assays, and the applications of gas-liquid chromatography.

510 Fermentation Microbiology (1:*:*). Eight hours of lecture and 16 to 20 hours of laboratory study. A three-day laboratory-intensive course introducing the theoretical and technical factors essential to the production and operation of large-scale fermentation systems. The techniques, methodologies, and principles of underlying applications of aerobic bacterial and fungal fermentations and anaerobic bacterial fermentations are presented. Lectures include an overview of fermentation, media components, seed stocks, growth yields, inoculation and sampling, computer-assisted control and monitoring, data analysis, scale-up, and safety considerations.

511 Microscopy/Photomicrography (1:*:*). Fourteen hours of lecture and 10 hours of laboratory study. A three-day course covering the principles and practices of light microscopy and photomicrography applicable to current instrumentation. Topics include image formations, Koehler illumination, equipment selection, contrast techniques, film and filters for photomicrography, exposure, focusing, and fluorescence photomicrography.

512 Freezing and Freeze-Drying of Microorganisms (1:*:*). Six hours of lecture and 18 hours of laboratory study. A three-day course discusses the theory and practice of cryopreservation of microorganisms. Topics include cellular responses to ice crystal formation, isotonicity changes, rates of cooling, latent heat of fusion, sublimation dynamics, collapse, meltback, and related phenomena. The importance of residual moisture, cryoprotectants and shelf-life prediction of cryopreserved materials and problems associated with specific cell types are also discussed.

513 Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques (1:*:*). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Five hours of lecture and 20 hours of laboratory study. A three-day course describing the theory and practice underlying conventional and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) cytogenetic methodologies. Current applications in the general and medical biosciences are highlighted. Topics include medical cytogenetics, chromosome morphology and nomenclature, staining techniques, autosomal and sex chromosome abnormalities, prenatal diagnostics, cancer cytogenetics, and molecular cytogenetics employing FISH methodologies.


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