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Illustrates the hourly data with a mean value of 14.37 kW-hr and a standard deviation of 4.78.  The P-value in this case is less than 0.024.  This data was taken based on one months’ time with 24 data points corresponding to the hours in a day.  The mean value here is the kW-hr usage for the specific month the data was collected on.  Here again, the standard deviation and P-value were small and with a much smaller data set to work with, it was actually the hourly data that was used to create our CPN model.  With over 97% of our data falling into the 95% confidence interval, our model would be a great representation of the current usage and would provide a standard to model how PEVs would or would not impact NOVECs’ customer service.
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Illustrates the yearly data with a mean value of 1522 kW-hr and a standard deviation of 539.7.  The P-value in this case is less than 0.005.  This data was taken based on one years’ time with 94 data points corresponding to the sample circuits from our data.  The mean value in this analysis is the monthly kW-hr usage during the year the data was collected for any user.  In the yearly data versus the monthly data, the bell curve is steeper due to the usage month to month.  The hourly data only looked at one month and the customers were very consistent no when they used or did not use electricity.  Over one years’ time, the usage varied from month to month, thus causing some months to be twice as high as the mean value.  This was another reason to use the hourly data over one month in our model development, since the model could be run for any given month in the future.
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As of yet, there are no regulations for Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) owners regulating when or how they may charge their vehicles.  Federal government has not arrived at a point where regulations and restrictions have needed to be implemented.  It is up to the electricity providers in the area to determine how much electric power they can provide to their communities and when it would be appropriate for PEVs to charge.  Electric providers have not yet started to restrict PEV owners from charging their vehicles during peak hours.
Critical regulatory issues will have to be resolved to enable charging stations installation, both in homes and for public use. State Public Utility Commissions will have to determine if and how to regulate public charging stations.
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Thus far, government action at all levels have influenced PEV sales and the integration of these new vehicles into the electrical grid. The Obama Administration has made an effort to stimulate the growth of the PEV market through public-private matching grants leveraging billions of stimulus dollars.  Tax incentives of up to $4000 per vehicle for using conversion kits to retrofit conventionally powered vehicles, and tax incentives of between $2,500 and $7,500 per PEV (depending on battery capacity) have been implemented in some areas.  With these incentives, more and more PEVs could be on the roads and needing to be charged both at home and in public area throughout the communities.
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