Center for Global Studies

Past Working Groups

 

In the past the Center has offered grants for interdisciplinary projects to a variety of working groups including:

 

 

 

Global Innovation in Science and Technology

About

The mission of the Working Group on Global Innovation in Science and Technology (GIST) was to investigate and compare how different countries are investing in and measuring innovation in science and technology. Locations for specific study focused on countries that are at different stages of development: China, which has emerged as a major player in science and technology (S&T) and has the world’s second largest economy; Korea, which has invested heavily in S&T and is poised to become a leader in green innovation; and Brazil, which has the goal of becoming the innovation leader in South America, and looking to become a leader in energy innovation.

Group contact was Connie McNeely.

For past events and activities of the group click here.

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Global Relations of Emerging Powers

About

The past decade has witnessed the phenomenal rise to global prominence of countries such as China, India, and Brazil. While clearly driven by the economic dynamism exhibited by these "emerging powers," this phenomenon is by no means confined to the realm of global trade and commerce. Emerging powers have been asserting themselves in the diplomatic arena through new great power conglomerations such as the G20 and have also been pursuing various "soft power strategies" centered on cultural projection and new development aid practices. The Global Relations of Emerging Powers Working Group brought together faculty from multiple schools and departments with the goal of cultivating a culture of multidisciplinary scholarship around emerging powers and their global relations.

Group contact was Peter Mandaville

For past events and activities of the group click here.

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Globalization and Infectious Disease

About

The Globalization and Infectious Disease working group brought together scholars from epidemiology, geography, global and community health, international affairs, nursing, public health and other academic programs to address the complex determinants and the societal impacts of infectious disease. These issues included the widespread impacts of disease burden in the developing world and emerging concerns about global public health security. The core working group was a springboard for scholarship that advanced the excellence, visibility, and integration of George Mason University’s public health and globalization programs, and promoted interdisciplinary research on these important topics across the campus.

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Globalization and Society in India

About

The Globalization & Society in India Working Group fostered intellectual exchanges and academic discussions among scholars interested in issues related to globalization and India, both from within and outside of George Mason University. Its goal was to produce empirical research, contributing and engaging in current debates about the globalization processes that take shape in and are shaping India. The group organized myriad activities, such as guest speakers, publications, panel discussions, workshops, and film screenings. Key interests included questions of identity and personhood in post-liberalization India, restructured work spaces and relationships, visual imagery of a burgeoning consumer society, and a critical inquiry into the rhetoric of emancipation in India's globalization process.

Group contact was Supriya Baily.

For past events and activities of the group click here.

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Inequity, Exclusion, and Development: Prospects for the Middle East and Other Developing Countries

About

In the 1980s, the dominant approach to the political economy of development emphasized growth and its presumed policy correlates (austerity measures, trade liberalization, privatization, etc.). The logic of this “Washington Consensus” was that long-term economic growth would offset the short-term social and political costs of these policies through a trickle-down effect. Yet as reform programs faltered and polarization and income disparity increased dramatically in various developing countries, these theories gradually came under new scrutiny, both by long-time detractors and proponents of growth. In recent years, fieldwork in the field of development has grown, providing data that demonstrated the importance of equity for sustained development. This working group engaged in research on the proposed topic, with the aim of developing research papers that made a contribution to the debate based primarily, but not exclusively, on Middle Eastern cases.

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Music of the Americas

About

The Working Group on Music of the Americas brought together GMU faculty and graduate students from several different disciplines with a common research interest in popular music. The working group proposed to move the transnational from the margins to the center. Through a series of panels and workshops, the Music of the Americas working group endeavored to advance interdisciplinary research into the hemispheric flow of musical ideas, sounds, practices, and preferences. The group included musical performance in their events in order to bring together realms of musical experience and ways of thinking about musical inquiry that have traditionally been kept separate.

Group contact was Matt Karush.

For past events and activities of the group click here.

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Social Theory & Globalization

About

The Social Theory and Globalization working group served as a platform for interdisciplinary scholarship in order to analyze the evolution of social change in light of globalizing processes in societies around the world. Of special interest for the group were conceptual vectors that help explain contemporary transformations of global, social and political orders. This new global configuration has ramifications on theory debates including, for instance, development, nationalism, neoliberalism, social movements, and urbanism. Through discussion panels, reading groups, seminars, conferences and other public events, this group promoted research that focused on the theoretical underpinnings of newly rising global social phenomena as a result of burgeoning transnational structures and their influence on local, national and regional communities. The group’s work also addressed the interdependence of states and other international actors, such as multinational corporations, non-profit organizations and grassroots movements, and their sociopolitical consequences for society, using a multi-dimensional and critical perspective.

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The Welfare State in Times of Crisis

About

The Welfare State in Times of Crisis Working Group investigated the complex challenges faced by welfare states in the post-2008 era, exploring and comparing political and economic responses to tackle the tensions between the fiscal constraints faced by governments, on the one hand, and the need for policies that promote peoples' well being on the other hand. The group addressed a key question—"What are the future prospects of the welfare state?" The group did not limit its work to advanced industrial democracies, but also studied the global implications of challenges to the welfare state.

Group contact was Mariely Lopez-Santana

For past events and activities of the group click here.

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