Center for Global Studies

You are invited to attend the public event scheduled for February 16, 2012, which features the launch of the newly published collection edited by Oxford Transitional Justice Research, Critical Perspectives in Transitional Justice (Intersentia Publishers, 2012), which includes a chapter by Center for Global Studies Co-Director Jo-Marie Burt:
 

Protest, Violence, and Contested Memories: 

Navigating Past and Present Ruptures in Iraq, Russia, and Rwanda

 

Panel discussion co-hosted by Oxford Transitional Justice Research (University of Oxford) and the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London).

6:00-8:00pm - Thursday, February 16, 2012

Public Bar, 1214 18th St. NW, Washington, DC, 20036

Presentations:

• The 1991 Uprising and the Politics of Memory in Iraq

    Dr. Dina Khoury

    Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, George Washington University

• Russia, Past and Future: The Implications of the 2012 Presidential Elections for Post-Soviet  

   Memory Politics

   Dr. Danielle Granville

   Executive Committee Member, Oxford Transitional Justice Research

• Memory and Justice after Genocide: The Challenges of History and Accountability in Rwanda

    Dr. Phil Clark

    Lecturer in Comparative and International Politics, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London  

    Advisory Board Member, Oxford Transitional Justice Research

Chair:

    Dr. Zachary Kaufman

    Professorial Lecturer, Elliot School of International Affairs, George Washington University

    Attorney practicing at an international law firm

The past - and how it is recorded, debated, mobilized, and discarded - resonates powerfully in the present. This is especially the case in societies that have experienced mass violence, as contestation over how to remember or forget a fractious history create fresh grievances, often with violent consequences.

This panel discussion focuses on three such societies - Iraq, Russia, and Rwanda - in which contested memories of armed conflict have generated major political, social, and cultural ruptures. Consequently, current debates over governance, democracy, and justice are inseparable from arguments over responsibility for past violations and appropriate forms of memorialization and commemoration. In these settings, the complex politics of memory shape political dynamics at regional, national, and community levels. Drawing on extensive theoretical and empirical research, this panel will explore the critical intersections of violence, remembrance, forgetting, trauma, and power. 

THis event will also serve as the book launch for the new collection edited by Oxford Transitional Justice Research, Critical Perspectives in Transitional Justice (Intersentia Publishers, 2012).

Finger food will be provided and drinks will be available for purchase from the bar. Bookings are essential. To RSVP or to request further information, please contact politicsofmemorypanel@gmail.com by February 10.

 

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