Center for Global Studies

 

Working Groups

CGS promotes collaborative scholarship by forging interdisciplinary connections among university faculty.  CGS currently supports working groups in the following areas:

The most recent application guidelines (2013-2014) for those interested in creating a working group can be found here.

For a list of past working groups click here.

 

 

Cities & Globalization

About

Interest in the study of cities in global context, and of cities as transnational spaces where globalization is produced, experienced, and challenged, has grown dramatically in recent years. Scholars from a wide range of disciplines have turned their attention to urban spaces, which for the first time in history are home to a majority of the urban population. The purpose of the working group is to both contribute a distinctive voice to this interdisciplinary inquiry and to develop a collaborative space, drawing from the considerable expertise that exists within the university.

The mission of the Cities & Globalization Working Group is to provide a space for faculty and graduate students from a variety of disciplines and approaches across George Mason University to share work, comment on writing projects, and build consciousness around urban issues and urban research in global and transnational contexts. We create a dynamic environment where Mason scholars and graduate students can come together, both to enrich our own work and thinking, and work to bring global urban studies to a wider audience.

Group contact is Tony Roshan Samara

The Cities & Globalization Working Group's blog site can be accessed here

 

Working Group Members

 

Past Events

For past events and activities of the Cities & Globalization Working Group click here.

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Human Rights & Global Justice

About

For several years now, a group of Mason scholars and students have participated in the Human Rights and Global Justice Working Group (formerly the Transitional and Transnational Justice Working Group) to explore mutual interests related to human rights, transitional justice, and the globalization of the norms and mechanisms local societies use to address the legacies of atrocity, genocide, and crimes against humanity.

The HRGJ Working Group is especially interested in the way in which global justice operates, both at the level of international norms institutions such as the UN and the International Criminal Court, but also how global justice norms and institutions affect and constitute domestic efforts to address the legacy of human rights violations in post-conflict societies. The group is especially interested in engaging the literature on historical memory as well as the transitional justice scholarship, which focuses on the mechanisms adopted by societies to address past mass atrocity and human rights abuses. These include, among others, a comparative approach to justice; a comparative assessment of the variety and varied success of transitional justice initiatives, including truth commissions, trials, reparations, memorials and commemorations, lustration, among others; the conceptual challenge of defining victims, perpetrators, impartial judges, and other actors in the post-conflict justice arena; as well as defining key concepts, such as justice, accountability, healing, transnationalism, reparations, etc.

The group has engaged in a variety of very successful activities since its inception in Fall 2007, including institutionalizing our annual global justice film festival series, which just completed its fourth year. This year, we would like to focus more intensively on developing possible research collaborations, though we will also organize one speaker event and maintain our global justice film series.

Group contact is Jo-Marie Burt

 

Working Group Members

 

Past Events

For past events and activities of the Human Rights & Global Justice Working Group click here.

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Global Complexity & Ethical Education

About

Virtually every country in the world is currently trying to "reform" its formal education system to become more efficient (variously measured) and more effective (variously defined) and to take advantage of new opportunities and demands, both domestic and global. At the same time, the technology and infrastructure of education delivery are changing rapidly and thus providing a wider array of approaches to education. Not surprisingly, debates over the directions of reform and the very aims of education itself are contentious and highly varied. Among the heterogeneous challenges to the status quo within the education field are increasing calls for educators to broaden their purview and prepare learners not only to enter a "global workforce" but also to live ethically within an increasingly complex international context. This Working Group will investigate emerging research on the changes in educational practice and purpose amidst such global complexity and examine opportunities for pedagogical innovation that supports informed ethical engagement.

Group contacts are Arthur Romano and Susan Hirsch

 

Working Group Members

 

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Globalization and Northeast Asia

About

Asia continues to rise despite the Great Recession but it has also become clear that Asian prosperity is ultimately tied to the health of the global economy. This working group seeks to enhance George Mason University's global studies research agenda by linking Northeast Asia to the global community through interdisciplinary studies of global issues, starting with two areas: disaster management and gender equality.

Northeast Asia has seen a number of massive natural disasters such as the Wenchuan earthquake and the East Japan earthquake and tsunami. In today’s globalized world, the impact of these disasters hit not only the countries where they take place, but also neighboring countries and people on political, economic, social, and psychological levels. This project seeks to review the impact of recent disasters from multiple aspects, identify lessons learned from these disasters about disaster management in Northeast Asia, and explore possible areas of improvement for future preparedness.

This working group will also study the historical, political, economic, legal and cultural dimensions of the gender equality issue in Northeast Asia. The project seeks to examine the potential opportunities for and risks to gender equality posed by the rapid economic growth and the increasing use of technology and media in the region and the global community.

The group hopes to contribute to Mason's Songdo campus in the Republic of Korea by drawing attention to Mason's considerable expertise on Northeast Asia, by encouraging greater academic collaboration among the Mason faculty and students, and by experimenting with models of research collaboration bridging Mason's Fairfax campus and Songdo campus.

Group contact is Ming Wan

Working Group Members

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