Resources on Ukraine-Russia War

Mason Is a Source of In-Depth Information

Our university community is rich in knowledge about all aspects of the Ukraine-Russia war. We're sharing that knowledge with the world.

News organizations around the globe are turning to Mason's subject matter experts for information in such areas as:

  • The role intelligence played in events leading up to the conflict, as well as its impact on the fighting.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin's thought processes and agenda.
  • The possibility of Russia's use of chemical weapons in its assault.
  • The impact of the war on global and U.S. markets.
  • How Russian oligarchs, real estate, and money laundering factor into the wider conflict.

If you have questions, we have answers. We're here to keep our community, the nation, and the world informed about what's happening and how it affects you.


Former Intelligence Leaders Discuss Their Views on Russia, Ukraine

Five former senior intelligence leaders offered their perspectives on the world-changing full invasion of Ukraine by Russia and the role intelligence has played in The Directors' View: Russia & Ukrainean event hosted by Mason’s Michael V. Hayden Center for Intelligence, Policy, and International Security.

Few have experienced world crises such as former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, and former leaders of the Central Intelligence Agency Michael Hayden, John Brennan, Leon Panetta, and Michael Morell. All faced challenges from Russia in these roles and throughout their storied careersHayden Center Director Larry Pfeiffer, former CIA chief of staff, moderated this conversation.

Read a news story about the directors' discussion.


More Videos and Podcasts 

 

Louise Shelley
Shelley

Russia's War in Ukraine is Tied to Corruption, Organized Crime (Access to Excellence podcast, May 20): Schar School professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, discusses how criminals and terrorists take advantage in diverse ways of the globalized world in which we live. 

To Be Seen: Blackness in Ukraine Before and During the Russo-Ukrainian War of 2022. A presentation by Mason's programs in Global Affairs, Russian and Eurasian Studies, and African and African American Studies. Kimberly St. Julian Varnon, PhD candidate in history at the University of Pennsylvania, spoke about the meaning and experience of Blackness in Ukraine.  

Ukrainian Cinema, Language Politics, and National Identity: Presented by the Russian and Eurasian Studies program, featuring Vitaly Chernetsky, professor of Slavic languages and literatures, University of Kansas.  

The Current State of Russia's War on Ukraine (video, April 6): Faculty from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution, and the Schar School of Policy and Government discussed the current state of Russia's war on Ukraine.

Larry Pfeiffer
Pfeiffer

On Ukraine, Russia, China, and A Very Messy World (podcast, March 15): Larry Pfeiffer, director of Mason's Hayden Center for Intelligence, Policy, and International Security, discusses Vladimir Putin’s real agenda in Ukraine with Mason President Gregory Washington

The War in Ukraine (video, March 9): Roundtable conversation with faculty from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, sponsored by the Russian and Eurasian Studies program and the Global Affairs program.

Targeting Russian Oligarchs (video, March 8): Mason’s Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC) and the Anti-Corruption Advocacy Network (ACAN) hosted Tom Firestone, an expert on Russian law, crime, and corruption to speak about several timely topics. 

The Ukraine Crisis: What It Really Means (video, February 11): Panel event hosted by the Michael V. Hayden Center for Intelligence, Policy, and International Security, Schar School of Policy and Government. 

 


Mason  Stories

Robert McGrath
McGrath

Mason Students Map the Russia-Ukraine War through Personal Stories (May 9): Students at Mason’s Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution are actively assessing the conflict dynamics, with hopes that their research could improve the situation.

Peace and Conflict Resolution Scholars, Foreign Affairs Practitioners Convene at Mason's Point of View (March 30): The group, which includes former U.S. Ambassador to Armenia John M. Evans, former U.S. Ambassador to the U.S.S.R. Jack F. Matlock Jr., and former Canadian Ambassador for Disarmament to the United Nations Peggy Mason, drafted and issued a statement calling for a peace agreement. 

Ukraine Crisis Student Support Fund Accepting Applications for Aid (March 23): The Student Support and Advocacy Center (SSAC) has established the Ukraine Crisis Student Support Fund (UCSSF), available to Mason students from Ukraine and Russia who are experiencing financial challenges and hardships due to the ongoing war in Ukraine. Apply for aid or make a donation.

Former U.S. Intelligence ‘Cold Warriors’ Give Insights on Russia’s war in Ukraine (March 17): America’s overwhelming focus on terrorism following 9/11 gave Vladimir Putin the impression that he could act with impunity without fear of paying a price. The “bad, bad miscalculation” likely emboldened him to invade Ukraine and has drawn the world closer to World War III than at any time since the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.

App Maps Violence in Ukraine Based on In-Country News Sources (March 15): A web-based app developed by a Schar School professor Robert McGrath visualizes near-real-time data collected from media sources on the ground in Ukraine. Users can filter an interactive map of rapidly developing events in neighborhoods throughout the country. 

Karina Korostelina
Korostelina

Multi-Campus ‘Teach In’ Explores in Depth the Crisis in Ukraine (March 9): The grim realities and uncertain prospects of the war in Ukraine were examined from all fronts at a Schar School multi-campus, in-person “teach-in,” presented by the Center for Security Policy Studies and cosponsored by the International Relations Policy Task learning community.  

Anton Liagusha
Liagusha

The Conflict in Ukraine Is Fueled by Putin’s Information War, Carter School Expert Says (March 4): The ongoing war in Ukraine is unique from other conflicts, and the international community can take five actions to control the situation, said professor Karina Korostelina, director of the Program for the Prevention of Mass Violence at the Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution

Schar School Welcomes ‘Exiled’ Ukrainian Media Professor (February 23): The conflict in Ukraine the world is observing now is nothing new to Anton Liagusha. When Russia-backed separatists took over the Donetsk National University in Donetsk, Ukraine, in 2014, “It was a very difficult time,” said Liagusha, an associate professor at the Schar School, who was teaching at the university. Liagusha was selected to come to the Schar School for a year under the New University in Exile Consortium program, 

 


National/International Media

Christine McDaniel portrait
McDaniel

Is the West Considering the Ripple Effects of the War in Ukraine? (The Hill, May 21): Joshua Huminski, visiting fellow at the Scalia Law School’s National Security Institute, writes about the possible long-term impact of war in Ukraine.

Putin’s Next Big Farce Is Happening Right Under Our Noses (The Daily Beast, May 19):  Schar School professor Ronald Marks comments on Vladimir Putin’s decision to invade Ukraine

We’ve Never Seen a Country Go Backwards as Quickly as Russia (The Hill, May 13): Christine McDaniel, senior research fellow at Mason's Mercatus Center, writes that Russia risks losing much of the foreign investment the country has attracted over the years.

‘His brother was worse’ – the rise of a post-Putin Russia (The Hill, May 13): Schar School professor Ronald Marks writes about the rise of a Post-Putin Russia.

A Nuclear Strike Might Not Prompt the Reaction You Expect (Bloomberg, May 10): CHSS Economics professor Tyler Cowen, director of the Mercatus Centerwrites about potential fallout if Russia were to use a tactical nuclear weapon in Ukraine. Also in The Washington Post.

Fueling Secession, Promising Bitcoins: How a Russian Operator Urged Catalonian Leaders to Break With Madrid (Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, May 8): Schar School professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, comments on the link between Catalonians and Russians.

Justin Gest portrait
Gest

Sources: Putin's Reputed Girlfriend Set to Be Sanctioned by EU (CNN, May 7): Schar School professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, comments on the possible sanctions (Shelley starts at the 20-second mark).

Ukraine Receives Weapons Support from Around the World (The Conversation, May 6): Schar School Political Science  PhD student Jordan Cohen breaks down the weapons support sent to Ukraine from around the world. Also in The New Haven (Conn.) Register.

Former CIA Senate Liaison Says U.S. Must Continue Strong Support of Ukraine (Government Matters, April 26): Schar School professor Ronald Marks comments on Ukraine, Putin and the control of information.

Oligarch Family Deaths Appear to Be Too Similar (Dan Abrams Live, April 26):  Schar School professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, discusses the recent murders of two Russian oligarchs and their families.

Richard Rubenstein
Rubenstein

Two Russian Oligarchs and Their Families Found Dead within 24 Hours (CNN, April 25): Schar School professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, comments on the murders (Shelly starts at the 50-second mark).

Civilians in the Gray Zone: New Rules for New Hybrid Wars? (The Geopolitics, April 23): Schar School policy fellow Joanna Rozpedowski writes about civilians as targets in today’s modern warfare

Russian Missteps in Ukraine Offer China Lessons in Better Military Strategy, Stronger Troop Morale (South China Morning Post, April 21):  Schar School professor Michael Hunzeker talks about what China may be learning from Russia’s Ukraine invasion.

The U.S. Should Support a National Ukrainian War Crimes Tribunal (The Hill, April 16): Carter School professor Douglas Irvin-Erickson writes about the U.S. supporting a national war crimes tribunal regarding Ukraine.

Ronald Marks
Marks

Zelensky: Should Not Be Afraid of Russia's Nukes, but Be Ready (CNN, April 15): Schar School professor Ronald Marks comments on potential consequences of the U.S continuing to arm Ukraine

Midterms Raise Fears of Russian Cyberattacks (The Hill, April 14): Scalia Law School's Jamil Jaffer, founder of the National Security Institute, comments on the likelihood of increased Russian cyberattacks. 

By Accepting Ukrainian and Russian refugees, Canada Can Do Good and Do Well (The Globe and Mail, April 12): Scalia Law professor Ilya Somin co-authors a piece about the need for Canada to accept some Ukrainian and Russian refugees. 

Russia vs. Ukraine: No Vaccine For War Fever (CounterPunch, April 13): Richard Rubenstein, University Professor with the Carter School, writes about the ways in which public opinion can shift during war and military conflicts.

Lessons from Ukraine: Beijing Should Think Twice about Attacking Taiwan (Taiwan Insight, April 11): Schar School adjunct faculty instructor Gerritt van der Weiss writes that China would be ill-advised to attack Taiwan in light of events in Ukraine

Tyler Cowen
Cowen

CNN Report (Video, April 5): Schar School professor Ronald Marks comments on reports about sanctions against Putin’s daughters.

CNN Report (Video, March 29): Schar School professor Ronald Marks discusses the latest moves by Russia's Vladimir Putin.

History is Rhyming in Ukraine (The Hill, March 28): Schar School professor Ronald Marks writes that Russian actions in the war against Ukraine are very familiar.

Gregory Koblentz
Koblentz

Once the Smoke Clears, What's Next for Ukraine and Russia? (The Hill, March 28): Joshua Huminski, visiting fellow at the Scalia Law School’s National Security Institute, writes about what might be next for Ukraine and Russia following the fighting.

How Putin's War in Ukraine Can Advance Immigration Policy in the United States (MSNBC, March 27): Schar School professor Justin Gest joins Jonathan Capehart to break down the bearing a foreign war may have on the United States' domestic immigration politics, as the Biden administration announces a major overhaul to the asylum process. (Gest appears at the 40-second mark.)

What Ukraine Shows us about American Politics (The Hill, March 27): Bill Schneider, professor emeritus at the Schar School, looks at Americans' attitudes toward the war.

Ellen Laipson
Laipson

Amid False Russian Allegations of U.S. “Biolabs” in Ukraine, It’s Worth Asking: What Is a Bioweapon? (Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, March 25): Gregory Koblentz, director of the Biodefense Graduate Program at Mason, comments on anthrax and modern biowarfare programs.

U.S.-GCC Ties in 'Rough Patch' after Gulf States Rebuff Calls to Isolate Russia, Experts Say(Middle East Eye, March 24): Schar School professor Ellen Laipson comments on current tensions between the U.S. and countries in the Middle East over the conflict in Ukraine. 

Bill Schneider
Schneider

New ‘Russian Asset Tracker’ Tallies $17.5B Worth of Oligarchs’ Wealth (New York Post, March 21): Schar School professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, comments on efforts to go after the overseas property of Russian oligarchs.

We Must Put Emotions Aside and Ask the Hard Questions on Ukraine (The Hill, March 20): Joshua Huminski, visiting fellow at the Scalia Law School’s National Security Institute, says the United States and NATO must clarify priorities, strategic interests and the risks we're willing to accept to create conditions for a political settlement on the ground. 

 Richard Kauzlarich
Kauzlarich 

A Legacy of ‘Secrecy and Deception’: Why Russia Clings to an Outlawed Chemical Arsenal (Washington Post, March 19): Gregory Koblentz, director of the Biodefense Graduate Program at Mason, comments on Russia's work on chemical weapons.

Russia's Killer Drone in Ukraine Raises Fears About AI in Warfare (Wired, March 17): Zak Kallenborn, a fellow at the Schar School, comments on Russian "suicide drones" as autonomous artificial intelligence-driven weapons.

Energy Diplomacy and the War in Ukraine (American Diplomat podcast, March 17): Former Ambassador and Schar School adjunct professor Richard Kauzlarich discusses energy diplomacy and international sanctions. (Kauzlarich starts at the 2:32 mark.)

 Arctic Security and Cooperation (Lawfare's The Chatter podcast, March 17): David Priess, senior fellow at the Michael V. Hayden Center for Intelligence, Policy, and International Security, explores the Ukraine-Russia war's reverberations.

Zak Kallenborn
Kallenborn

Background Briefing with Ian Masters Podcast (March 17): Gregory Koblentz, director of the Biodefense Graduate Program at Mason, discusses Russia’s threat of using chemical weapons in Ukraine.

What Oil and Gold Prices Tell Us About the Market Reaction to the War in Ukraine (Washington Examiner, March 17): Bruce Yandle, adjunct fellow at Mason's Mercatus Center, discusses the impact of the war on global markets.

Enough is Enough: It's Time for 'Plan B' to Counter Putin (The Hill, March 16): Gen. Scalia Law School’s Jamil Jaffer, founder of the National Security Institute, co-authors an op-ed about the need for additional measures to thwart Vladimir Putin

Six Things NATO Can Do to Help Ukraine Right Now (Foreign Policy, March 16): Schar School professor Michael Hunzeker co-authors a piece on options that would be better than a no-fly zone.

Putin on a Short Leash From Now On (ABC News Radio, March 16): Schar School professor Mark Katz comments on Russian leader Vladimir Putin's vulnerability amid the Ukraine situation. (Katz starts at the 34-second mark.)

Mark Katz
Katz

The Limits Of Social Media Soft Power (Cyber Security Intelligence, March 15): Schar School visiting professor Ronald Marks, a former CIA case officer, writes about “media soft power” in wartime.

How Russia’s Fake Claims about Ukraine Bioweapons Spread from Telegram Anti-Vaxxers to Fox News (The U.K. Independent, March 15): Gregory Koblentz, director of the Biodefense Graduate Program at Mason, comments on  Russia’s biological weapons disinformation campaign, which dates to the 1980s, when it blamed the U.S. for HIV. 

The View of Ukraine from Taiwan: Get Real about Territorial Defense (War on the Rocks, March 15): Schar School professor Michael Hunzeker co-authors a piece on what Russia's invasion of Ukraine means to Taiwan.

Russia and Chemical Weapons: What You Need to Know (CNN, March 15): Gregory Koblentz, director of the Biodefense Graduate Program at Mason, gives a detailed interview regarding chemical and biological weapons and the possibility Russia could use them in Ukraine.

The Russian Military Should Overthrow Putin — for Russia's Sake and Its Own (The Hill, March 14): Schar School professor Mark Katz writes that the best way now to stop Russia quickly would be for Putin to be  removed from power and replaced by a new leader willing to reverse course. 

Russian War, Inflation Pinch U.S. Economy (The Hill, March 14): David Beckworth, senior research fellow at Mason's Mercatus Center is quoted about the impact of inflation and the Russian invasion of Ukraine on the U.S. economy. 

Michael Hunzeker
Hunzeker

Russia, China and Tucker Carlson Lack Evidence on Ukraine Bioweapons Labs (Poynter, March 14): Gregory Koblentz, director of the Biodefense Graduate Program at Mason, says the labs referenced are public health and veterinary facilities.

How Autocrats Exploit the Definition of Terrorism for Their Own Purposes (Homeland Security Today, March 13): Schar School professor Marmut Cengiz writes about states whose leaders have targeted and labeled the opposition as terrorists, resulting in thousands of human-rights violations.

Alpaslan Özerdem
Özerdem

The West Must Decide How Far is Too Far with Russia (The Hill, March 13): Joshua Huminski, visiting fellow at the Scalia Law School’s National Security Institute, discusses how the West must be very cautious and very calculated in how it proceeds.

Will the U.S. Continue to Play a Leadership Role? (The Hill, March 13): Bill Schneider, professor emeritus at the Schar School, looks at the United State's potential to continue to be a global leader. 

News Nation report (March 10, video): Larry Pfeiffer, director of Mason's Hayden Center for Intelligence, Policy, and International Security, discusses Vladimir Putin’s apparent apathy to tactics used by the West to try to stop the conflict in Ukraine. (Pfeiffer starts at the 3:40 mark.)

The Russian Invasion, Gas Prices and a WNBA Superstar (The Special Report, March 9): Scalia Law professor Ilya Somin discusses Ukrainian refugees. (Somin appears in video at the 21:19 mark.)

Weak US Disclosure Rules Conceal CRE Owned by Russia’s Oligarchs (GlobeSt.com, March 4): Schar professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, comments on Russian's commercial real estate holdings.

Nightline (ABC News, March 3): Schar professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, is interviewed about the disastrous impact Russia’s war in Ukraine will have on Russia’s future.

Ilya Somin
Somin

Russian Money Flows Through U.S. Real Estate (NBC News, March 2): Schar professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, explains how Russian oligarchs, real estate, and money laundering factor into the wider conflict.

Cancel Culture Against Russians is the New McCarthyism (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 2): CHSS Economics professor Tyler Cowen, director of the Mercatus Center, warns of the damage of condemning all things Russian. 

Do Sanctions Against Russian Oligarchs work? (Brian Ross Investigates, Law and Crime Network, March 2): Schar professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, is interviewed about the impact of personally targeted sanctions. (Shelley's appearance begins appears at the 3:52 mark.)

What the Montreux Convention Is, and What It Means for the Ukraine War (The Conversation, March 1): Carter School Dean Alpaslan Özerdem explains the role this convention plays in keeping the Ukrainian war from being even worse.

What is ‘Navalny 35’ List? Payback Time for Insanely Rich Russian Oligarchs Close to Putin? (International Business Times, March 1): Schar professor Louise Shelley, director of Mason's Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, discusses Alexei Navalny's list of 35 oligarchs believed to be close to Vladimir Putin.

Jamil Jaffer
Jaffer

Experts Paint Dark Picture for Region, Global Order if Russia Invades (The Hill, February 28): Scalia Law School’s Jamil Jaffer, founder of the National Security Institute, comments on Russia’s economy. 

The ISIS Model and its Influence Over Global Terrorism (European Scientific Journal, February 28): Schar professor Mahmut Cengiz is co-author of an article on how others copy tactics developed by ISIS.

Why America’s Middle Eastern Allies Haven’t Condemned Russia’s War in Ukraine (The Hill, February 28): Schar School professor Mark Katz discusses how America’s allies sometimes prioritize threats differently from the U.S. — and from each other. 

If Russia Invades Ukraine, What’s Next? (The Hill, February 13): Joshua Huminski, visiting fellow at the Scalia Law School’s National Security Institute, outlines what must be done in response to a Russian invasion of Ukraine.